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New Indian aircraft carrier.
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sabya99
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 08, 2014 8:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

LIVE: PM Narendra Modi embarks on India's largest warship IN…
http://youtu.be/7r0IQyvhCp8
INS VIKRAMADITYA AND INS VIRAAT SAILING TOGETHER :
http://youtu.be/olJopSrK0O0
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PostPosted: Fri Jul 11, 2014 7:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Aircraft Careers of the world : http://www.rediff.com/news/slide-show/slide-show-1-defence-news-photos-the-worlds-10-largest-aircraft-carriers/20140707.htm
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 14, 2014 9:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Gaza violence denies warship its firepower

http://www.telegraphindia.com/1140814/jsp/nation/story_18720388.jsp#.U-zTreNdWGM

New Delhi, Aug. 13: Israel’s bombing of the Gaza Strip has combined with a technical failure by India’s defence research outfit to delay a missile that was to be installed on the INS Kolkata, a warship scheduled to be commissioned by Prime Minister Narendra Modi on Saturday.
The case illustrates just how global conflicts immediately impact India, particularly its defence preparedness because the Indian military is so dependent on imports and foreign know-how.
The commissioning of a warship means that it is battle-ready.
But the INS Kolkata is bereft of its long-range surface-to-air missile (LR-SAM), its main defence against aerial threats, and an active towed array sonar (ATAS), one of two sensors to detect underwater (submarine) threats, senior officers admitted today.
“We are concerned,” said Vice Admiral A.V. Subhedar, controller of warship production and acquisition. “But we expect that the missile will be available shortly; the launchers are ready.”
The LR-SAM was to be co-developed by India’s Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) and Israel Aircraft Industries under a 2006 agreement.


Rear Admiral A.B. Singh, the Assistant Chief of Naval Staff (policy & plans), said compartments of the missile — also called the Barak NG (next generation) — were ready but it is to be integrated after being test-fired in Israel.
A previous test of the missile in February failed “because there were oscillations and it did not meet all parameters”.
A full test of the missile — when it will be fired from a launcher and will have to shoot down an incoming missile — is now likely in Israel only towards the end of September.
The test was delayed because of Israel’s bombardment of the Gaza Strip after rockets fired by the Hamas into Israel. Many international airlines cancelled flights to Tel Aviv till a shaky ceasefire began earlier this week.
The 6,800-tonne INS Kolkata is the first of Project 15A ships that will also have ships named after Kochi and Chennai.
Called a “stealth destroyer”, the Kolkata was due in 2010. It is already four years late. Despite the delay, the DRDO has not been able to complete the missile that would have a range of up to 70km. The Barak NG is meant to be the shield for not only the INS Kolkata but also of a carrier battle-group, if that is how she were to be tasked.
The project was first sanctioned in 2003 for Rs 3,580 crore. In 2011 the cost was hiked to Rs 11,662 crore. The Kolkata is also the “test-bed” for another class of four ships, called the Project 15B. It has an array of new systems, mostly developed indigenously, but the absence of the LR-SAM and the ATAS can limit the roles for which she is designed.
For the Directorate of Naval Design itself, the wing Vice Admiral Subhedar heads, the Kolkata may have been the star accomplishment in its 50th year. The engines of the Kolkata — gas turbines from Zorya of Ukraine — are also to be the main propulsion system for the Project 15B ships.
The assessment by the navy is that the troubles in Ukraine and Russia will not immediately affect the Zorya manufacturing facility in Ukraine. But the navy has said that it is scouting for other original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) for spares and supplies for the ships that are on order.
“The situation in Ukraine has brought to the forefront a fresh challenge to peace and stability in the region and a prolonged stand-off could have an adverse impact on international security and the global economy,” warns the annual report of the ministry of defence (2013-2014) released today.
A second ship to be commissioned this month, on August 23, is the P28 Kamorta built in Calcutta by the Garden Reach Shipbuilders and Engineers.
The Kamorta is described as an anti-submarine warfare (ASW) corvette. The principal director of naval design, Commodore B.S Nagpal, said the Kamorta was unique because of “90 per cent indigenisation”.
But the Kamorta, like the Kolkata, will not have the towed array sonar (TAS). In other words, the anti-submarine platform will not have a main submarine-detection sensor.
Defence minister Arun Jaitley said in Parliament last week that a German firm, Atlas Electronik, had been selected to supply the TAS — a tethered sensor — for not only the Kamorta but also for almost all frontline warships. Navy sources said they were also pursuing a programme with the DRDO to produce a TAS.
The navy currently has 44 ships on order, all being made in Indian shipyards, eight of them in the private sector.

Comments: Installing a questionable missile on a front line ship is not a wise idea. Whats going on in Navy headquarters? Also engine from Ukraine ? Is that well thought out project? There are plenty of companies ready to supply gas turbine engine to desi Navy! Towed array sonars of Kamotra of course is a different story! These are not the integral part of ship and could be installed years down the road.
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PostPosted: Sun Aug 17, 2014 10:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Our defence preparation and procurement has been in a shambolic state under the UPA regime.
No wonder the new govt is engaging with the Armed forces starting from the very top -the PM has made more visits to defence establishments and functions than any other state/civic function so far.
I'd rather forego some of my tax money get the Armed forces their requirements, than waiting for Wal Mart and other non-essential FDI at this point.
Lay down the civic infrastructure and strengthen Defence. Industry will pretty much take care of itself.
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 18, 2014 6:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

@ssbmat, thanks for your input. I don’t blame UPA or BJP govt. for this fiasco . It is a problem of Navy boys. It is their failed planning and shortsightedness. When they will grow up? Very Happy
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 25, 2014 6:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Decked for battle, not dressed to kill

SUJAN DUTTA ( The Telegraph August 24 th , 2014)

Visakhapatnam, Aug. 23: In the sailors’ galley of the INS Kamorta missile corvette, the menu for today -– the day it has been commissioned – offers routine Indian cuisine.
Idli, sambar, coconut chutney, tea and cake for breakfast; peas pulao, egg curry, masala mixed vegetables, dal tadka and paneer masala for lunch with curd and sai kheer for dessert; ginger tea for the late afternoon; and a dinner of tandoori roti, steamed rice, chicken curry, vegetable “chops”, vegetable curry, dal masala, fresh fruit and coffee.
The chef, Petit Officer Dharampal Singh, says the new galley --- packed with machines that mix the dough for the rotis, pressure cookers that steam the rice, choppers that slice vegetables into pieces and an assortment of microwave ovens --- will produce the meals for the crew of 1,073 sailors in good time.
Outside the galley, a full-length mirror at the door to the laundry –- also packed with washing and ironing machines -– has a banner over it that asks: “Are you dressed correctly?”
Full-length mirrors asking the same question are placed strategically all along the length of the ship, on each of its decks.
Mister “Are-you-dressed-correctly?” keeps watching as you duck under CFL bulbs, wires, metal boxes, cables and fire-extinguishing systems to traverse the innards of the ship on its microtek floor. The flooring is a glistening-black anti-corrosion layer speckled with something that looks like shimmer but isn’t quite it.
Amid the maze of compartments, somewhere in a clearing in the belly of the ship, made in Calcutta and the latest to join the navy’s fleet, is another banner: “This war machine has cost the nation Rs 1,900 crore. Learn to take care of it.”
The question remains: Is it dressed correctly, dressed for war?
Like the INS Kolkata, commissioned in Mumbai by Prime Minister Narendra Modi, the INS Kamorta lacks crucial equipment for its designed role in anti-submarine warfare. Chiefly, it lacks an active towed array sonar or ATAS, a sensor to detect submarines that is tethered to the aft of the ship.
For a submarine hunter-killer in the 21st century joining a navy in a disturbed neighbourhood --– as defence minister Arun Jaitley described the Indian Ocean Region --– that is a crucial lacuna.
For the men on board the ship, though, it’s par for the course.
“Say, I need a suit to go out to work. Should I take one that costs Rs 20,000?” Captain Manoj Jha, the commissioning commanding officer of the Kamorta, says.
“Maybe with half my month’s salary I can afford it, but do I need it when a suit worth Rs 5,000 can do some of the job?”
Jha and his men cannot afford to feel that the warship they run is anything but indomitable. The space under the heli-deck in the aft of the ship is vacant now, in the hope that the government will somehow be able to overcome its troubles and acquire the system the warship sorely needs.
For now, Jha’s “Rs 5,000 suit” is the HUMSA NG (hull mounted sonar --- next generation), made by defence public sector Bharat Electronics Limited and trusted to detect submarines.
With the Kolkata and the Kamorta, the navy has commissioned two warships that lack the equipment for their roles in hostile situations. The Kolkata even more so, because it does not have the missile defence system a multi-role destroyer like it is supposed to have.
Apart from the ATAS, the Kamorta is also hard pressed to find an ASW (anti-submarine warfare) helicopter that is supposed to be embarked on it. Its hangar is equipped for a Sea King 42 Bravo that is designed to dunk sonobuoys into the sea to detect submarines and, on spotting the enemy, kill it by firing depth charges and torpedoes.
Vice-Admiral Satish Soni, chief of the Eastern Naval Command, however, says the commissioning of ships with incomplete systems would not impact their operational roles to a great degree because, for the time being, other ships will complement them.
“It is not a capability gap, I would say. It is a dilution of a capability in a particular ship in a particular sphere. If, for example, Kolkata is not commissioned with an AMD (anti-missile defence) system, there are many such systems in the fleet,” he said.
“When the fleet is moving together, Kolkata is used for ASW functions. It is a multi-role ship. We will not say that Kolkata cannot be exploited. I would not be overly worried about this because this is the price that you pay if you are going in for high-tech, state-of-the-art systems.”
What the Kamorta does have, apart from plusher interiors, is what the navy says is an atmosphere simulator for battle in nuclear/biological/chemical warfare conditions. Even the modern machines for cooking in the galleys are a testimony to the improved quality of life for the ship’s company of 1,073 sailors and 13 officers.
In the bridge of the ship -– the command post -– the seats for the commanders can rival the comfort of posh cars driven by or for billionaires.
A bulbous antenna in the ship’s stern is capable of connecting it seamlessly to the navy’s Rukmini satellite, through which it can receive and transmit data to all other vessels in the fleet in real time.
What the last means, says another officer, is that if the Kamorta, for example, has detected a submarine but does not have the helicopter to go after it, it can inform another warship in its flotilla and give the coordinates so that it may complete the job.
Should the question that the mirrors in the Kamorta ask of its crew be asked of the ship itself, the only answer can be a Woody Allen quip: “Eternal nothingness is fine, if you happen to be dressed for it.”
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PostPosted: Mon Nov 17, 2014 11:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

US firm set to pocket navy's copter contract

http://www.telegraphindia.com/1141117/jsp/nation/story_1627.jsp#.VGoxbzTF-GM

New Delhi, Nov. 16: US firm Sikorsky looks set to bag an Indian Navy order for 16 multi-role helicopters (MRH) and place itself as the top contender for another order for 123 helicopters in deals totalling billions of dollars.
The navy's helicopter fleet is in such a dire state that the number of Seakings is now barely in double digits. All navy frigates and destroyers are now designed to embark two helicopters each. The aircraft carriers (two) can embark up to 16 helicopters. The smaller offshore patrol vessels at least one. But there aren't enough helicopters. There are 134 warships in the fleet.
Sikorsky S-70B Seahawk and European firm NH Industries' NH-90 were both found suitable for the MRH requirement of the Indian Navy after trials in 2011. But the NH-90 is out of the race because Finmeccanica subsidiary AgustaWestland is a stakeholder in the firm.
AgustaWestland is a no-no for new defence contracts from India after the government decided not to award new deals to the firm because of the shadow of malpractice over its supply of VVIP helicopters. In January this year, the government cancelled the VVIP helicopter contract.
"The S-70B is now by default the navy's choice," an officer said. "We do not yet know the price they have quoted but a contract negotiation committee has been constituted."
Unofficial estimates based on the price at which Sikorsky sold two similar helicopters to the Brazilian Navy in 2012 peg the cost at about Rs 4,000 crore. But Sikorsky may turn out to be a far bigger beneficiary if the Indian Navy decides that another order for about 123 helicopters should also be awarded to it for reasons of synergy.
The navy currently flies seven types of helicopters. The first 16 MRHs will go towards meeting the navy's requirement for a replacement of its Seaking 42 and Seaking 42A helicopters that were decommissioned by the year 2000. Though the navy had opened a case for their replacement by that year, successive governments did not push it through.
The tender for the MRH specified that the selected helicopter should be equipped to attack submarines and ships, should be capable of search and rescue, night and commando operations.
The 16 MRHs, for which contract negotiations have begun, would be imported under the US Pentagon's foreign military sales programme. Under the terms of a new policy, the next 100-plus "naval multi-role helicopters" (called NMRH to distinguish them from the first order even though the technical specifications are likely to be the same) would be under the "make in India" condition.
If Sikorsky emerges as the selected partner, it would be expected that it will collaborate with an Indian firm to create manufacturing facilities in India to supply the NMRHs. This policy is already being questioned from within industry.
Foreign majors are wary of transferring technology and know-how, and importantly, guarantee the quality of products that they are not directly making. No Indian company currently builds a helicopter from scratch. Defence public sector Hindustan Aeronautics's "indigenous" Dhruv - a smaller class of helicopters than the MRH - operates with French-origin engines and rotor blades.
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 12, 2015 11:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Viraat to be decommissioned in 2016.
The aircraft carrier has served for 56 years


The Navy is learnt to have taken the call to retire the decrepit warhorse INS Viraat, the aircraft carrier that has had a service life of 56 years as on date — first as HMS Hermes in the Royal British Navy and in its present avatar since 1987.
Viraat — which saw action in the Falklands War and remained for well over a decade the sole aircraft carrier in the Indian Ocean region following the decommissioning of the first Indian carrier INS Vikrant in 1997 — is slated to have a grand farewell at the International Fleet Review at Visakhapatnam in February 2016.
It is in the process of obtaining Defence Ministry’s clearance to the retirement plan.
Mounting maintenance costs and rapid depletion of its integral fleet of Sea Harrier jump jets are said to have catalysed the decision to decommission Viraat. The Navy shelled out Rs. 70 crore for the last routine refit of the carrier.
The carrier was to have been dry-docked at the shipyard for the next round of periodic refit in December last year, but it was called off in view of the retirement proposal. Viraat is now expected to have its decommissioning refit sometime in the middle of 2015, say sources.
The retirement call was forced, in part, by the dwindling fleet of Sea Harrier fighters operating from the deck of Viraat. While the limited upgrade Sea Harrier (LUSH) programme bestowed the fighters with modern avionics and beyond visual range (BVR) strike capability, the ageing airframe has been a concern. Not more than seven Sea Harriers are available at the moment — some of them cannibalised (used as ‘Christmas Tree’ for spares) to keep the relatively agile ones airworthy.
“Thanks to the Navy’s stringent maintenance regimen, we have been able to operate Viraat without major glitches until now. But the Harrier fleet has dwindled so much that within the Navy, Viraat is often referred to as a ‘One Harrier carrier’. No point flogging it any further,” an official said.
India’s first carrier Vikrant, which was turned into a maritime museum post-retirement in 1997, has now been broken up after its upkeep became ostensibly unviable.
http://www.thehindu.com/news/national/ins-viraat-to-be-decommissioned-in-2016/article6884261.ece?widget-art=four-rel
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 18, 2015 7:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rs 50k-cr naval project gets Cabinet nod
Of 7 stealth frigates to be constructed, Mazagon Dock will build 4, Garden Reach Shipbuilders and Engineers 3

http://www.business-standard.com/article/economy-policy/rs-50k-cr-naval-project-gets-cabinet-nod-115021800042_1.html

The Cabinet Committee on Security on Tuesday sanctioned the country's biggest naval project, the construction of seven stealth frigates for Rs 45,381 crore. Mazagon Dock Ltd (MDL), Mumbai , will build four of these, while Garden Reach Shipbuilders and Engineers, Kolkata (GRSE), simultaneously builds the other three.

This project, dubbed Project 17A, follows on from the earlier Project 17, in which MDL built three 5,600-tonne frigates: INS Shivalik, Satpura and Sahyadri. The first of these, the Shivalik, entered service in 2009.

The timeline for Project 17A allows each shipyard a preparatory period of two years, in which they will prepare for construction and place orders for long-lead items like engines and transmission. Then they will actually build the warship over five years. The first two frigates would be delivered by MDL and GRSE in 2022, with the rest coming in pairs at one-year intervals.

The Project 17A frigates, while superficially similar to those build under Project 17, will pack significantly more punch with more advanced weaponry. The new vessels will be fitted with BrahMos cruise missile for land attack, and the new Indo-Israeli Long Range Surface-to-Air Missile (LR-SAM) that can shoot down incoming anti-ship missiles.

The main advance in Project 17A will be the "modular" method with which the frigates will be constructed. Traditional shipbuilding involved welding a hull together and launching it into water, after which swarms of craftsmen painstakingly work in the warship's cramped compartments, installing propulsion gear, electrically equipment, weapons, sensors and hundreds of kilometres of pipes and wiring.

In contrast, modular construction is like a giant Lego game. The ship is built in convenient 300-ton blocks that are then assembled together into a complete warship. Each block is fabricated in a well-lit, ventilated workshop with multi-level access, and is pre-fitted with the piping, electrical wiring and fitments that run through a ship. Giant cranes then bring the massive blocks together, each one dovetailing precisely with its neighbouring block, every wire, pipe and compartment coming together in perfect alignment.

Modular construction results in better build quality and is expected to bring down the build time from 72 to just 60 months.

This method, being new, has required a foreign design partner. It has also required an extensive renovation of both MDL and GRSE, with each shipyard spending Rs 800-1,000 crore on modular workshops, with Goliath cranes, and workshops with sliding roofs from where 300-tonne blocks can be lifted out.

Project 17A is vital for executing the navy's Maritime Capability Perspective Plan (MCPP), which envisions a 160-ship navy, with 90 capital warships, i.e. aircraft carriers, destroyers, frigates and corvettes. The navy is currently 20 vessels short of this target, with major shortfalls in destroyers and frigates.

To add numbers quickly, the navy had pressed for building the first two vessels of Project 17A abroad in the technology partners' shipyard. The United Progressive Alliance government overruled this.
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 2015 9:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Navy launches stealth destroyer 'Visakhapatnam'

http://www.deccanherald.com/content/472725/navy-launches-stealth-destroyer-visakhapatnam.html

The Indian Navy's new and biggest destroyer, Visakhapatnam, which has enhanced capacity to operate in nuclear, biological and chemical atmosphere, was put to the sea at a function here on Monday, officials said.

It was ceremonially launched by Minu Dhowan, wife of naval chief C.K. Dhowan, in the presence of top naval, defence and civilian officials.

The 163-metre long 7,300-tonne Visakhapatnam is the first of the four follow-on warships of the Kolkata Class Project 15A, designed indigenously and will give a significant boost to India's maritime capabilities when it joins Indian Navy in 2018.

The Kolkata Class did not have a full-fledged Total Atmosphere Control System (TAC), which is included in Visakhapatnam, according to an official.

The TAC system provides a capability of almost endless operating in a fall-out region whether it is a nuclear, chemical or biological, because the complete air taken inside is through nuclear, biological and chemical filters barring the machinery compartment, where wearing specialized masks would be mandatory.

Visakhapatnam is equipped with several indigenous weapon systems and an Israeli Multi Function Surveillance Threat Alert Radar (MF-STAR), which would provide targeting information to the 32 Barak 8 long-range surface-to-air-missiles aboard.

The Barak 8 missiles, being developed jointly by India and Israel, are being integrated into the Indian Navy's new destroyed INS Kolkata and shall be test-fired in October.

Besides, Visakhapatnam will also carry eight BrahMos missiles, a 127mm main gun, four 30mm rapid fire guns, and achieve speeds of over 30 knots with a maximum endurance of 400 nautical miles at an economical speed of 14 knots.

Fitted with a sophisticated Ship Data Network, an Automatic Power Management System and a Combat Management System, all information critical to operate the ship is made available to key officers through the SDN which the Indian Navy terms a "data information highway".

It incorporates state-of-the-art weaponry, sensors, supersonic surface-to-surface missiles, enabling it to engage shore-based and naval surface targets at long range.

The ship also has advanced air defence capability, designed to counter the threat of enemy aircraft and anti-ship cruise missiles and would revolve around the vertical launch and long range surface-to-air missiles system.

The ship can house a complement of 250 sailors and 50 officers, and has been designed by the Indian Navy's Directorate of Naval Design, as part of the country's commitment towards indigenization.

Visakhapatnam has been built by the Mazagaon Docks Ltd., India's premier warship building yard where four other destroyers and six submarines are being constructed
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PostPosted: Fri May 15, 2015 6:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Eye on China, Modi government clears funds for India's largest-ever warship

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/Eye-on-China-Modi-government-clears-funds-for-Indias-largest-ever-warship/articleshow/47290252.cms

NEW DELHI: India has finally set the ball rolling for the eventual construction of its largest-ever warship, the 65,000-tonne aircraft carrier INS Vishal. The defence acquisitions council (DAC) has sanctioned an initial Rs 30 crore as seed money for the project.

Just before PM Narendra Modi left for China on Wednesday night, the Manohar Parrikar-led DAC cleared a flurry of long-pending projects for ultra-light howitzers, medium-transport aircraft, light utility helicopters and the like worth over Rs 25,000 crore, as reported by TOI.

But tucked away in the approvals was the relatively minor amount of Rs 30 crore for the indigenous aircraft carrier-II (IAC-II). But its potential is huge, and very significant for a country that is vying with China for the same strategic space in the Indian Ocean Region (IOR).

Carrier battle groups are the final word in raw power projection around the globe, capable as they are of travelling 600 nautical miles a day with their supersonic fighters and missiles as well as accompanying destroyers, frigates and submarines.
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PostPosted: Sat May 16, 2015 12:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

so would this be besides the next INS Vikrant being built currently?? I apologize, have lost track of the developments...

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PostPosted: Sat May 16, 2015 12:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think so. It takes nearly a decade to build a flat top. Beside Nuc. Propulsion technology also not developed yet. I don’t think this ship will see light of the day before 2030s.
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PostPosted: Wed May 20, 2015 7:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

INS Kavaratti launched

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/kolkata/INS-Kavaratti-launched/articleshow/47346159.cms

KOLKATA: INS Kavaratti, fourth and last of the Kamorta-class Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) corvettes, was launched by the Garden Reach Shipbuilders and Engineers (GRSE) in Kolkata on Tuesday. The first ship of this class, INS Kamorta, has already joined the Eastern Fleet of the Indian Navy and is presently in Singapore, participating in the International Maritime Defence Exhibition, chief of naval staff Admiral R K Dhowan informed.

"GRSE has done a commendable job in supplying the Navy with indigenous ships since 1961. GRSE is today one of the foremost naval shipyards in the country. The INS Kavaratti is a very advanced vessel that will enhance the Navy's capabilities," said minister of state for defence Rao Inderjit Singh, whose wife Manita launched the ship.

According to GRSE chairman-cum-managing director Rear Admiral (retd) A K Verma, the INS Kadmatt and INS Kiltan, the other two ships of the Kamorta-class, are being fitted out by the shipyard and will be delivered on time to the Navy. "These ships are designed in a manner to evade detection by enemy radar. The superstructure of this ship has been built with carbon-fibre composite material that will make it lighter and help increase its speed. This is the first time that a shipyard in India has done this. GRSE has also bagged the order for three stealth frigates under the Navy's Project 17A," Verma said.

Dhowan pointed out that the INS Kavaratti has nearly 90% indigenous content that goes with Prime Minister Narendra Modi's motto: Make in India. "GRSE has already supplied a large number of warships to the Navy. We are very proud of the Kamorta class of ships. These shipyards have helped convert us into a builder's Navy from a buyer's Navy. At present, we have 48 ships and submarines under construction at various shipyards, both public and private, in the country," the navy chief said.

GRSE, before it underwent modernization a few years ago, came under fire from the navy for huge time and cost overruns. It overcame its shortcomings though and In 2014-15, recorded a Value of Production (VoP or turnover) of Rs 1,650 crore.

"We delivered the first indigenous ship, the INS Ajay, to the Navy in 1961. In 2015, we became the first shipyard in the country to deliver the Barracuda, the first warship to be exported by the country. This was our 94th warship. No shipyard in the country has achieved this. GRSE has been making profits for the last 22 years and our order book is full," Verma told TOI.

While the carbon-composite superstructure has been developed with Swedish assistance, steel used for all the four ASW corvettes was developed in India and built by SAIL. In fact, INS Kamorta was the first ship to be built in India with indigenous steel.

"All the ships of this class carry helicopters. Before the INS Kamorta, helo-decks used to have rail systems. The rails would project above the deck and prove a hindrance. GRSE, with technology from the UK, developed a wire-based system known as 'Rail-less Helo-traversing System' that is extremely successful. These ships also have foldable hanger doors developed by L&T. The earlier rolling hangers weren't reliable. We shall continue to deliver ships to the Navy at short intervals after this," Verma said.
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 10, 2015 10:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Cochin Shipyard undocks INS Vikrant

http://www.thehindu.com/news/national/kerala/ins-vikrant-undocked/article7301993.ece?homepage=true


Vikrant, weighing about 22,000 tonnes now, will continue to be outfitted for over a year and a half now before the basin and sea trials begin ahead of delivery.
India, on Wednesday, crossed a major milestone in defence shipbuilding when the maiden indigenous aircraft carrier INS Vikrant was undocked on completion of structural work at the Cochin Shipyard.
The carrier is slated for induction in end-2018.
Senior officials and workers of the public sector yard witnessed the undocking, done around 2 pm.
Problems with the dock gate and siltation at the gate mouth had forced the yard to postpone the undocking a few times earlier.
This time around, flooding of the dock and ballasting of the ship had begun on Monday itself. Once the vessel was floated over 8 metres of water pumped into the dock, the floodgate was overturned, after which Vikrant was pulled out by tugs.
Vikrant, weighing about 22,000 tonnes now, will continue to be outfitted for over a year and a half now before the basin and sea trials begin ahead of delivery.
"Almost 90 per cent of works below the fourth deck, all underwater works, is over. Major equipment have gone in. Cabling, piping, electrical works, heat and ventilation works will take place now. Delivery of systems and components for the aviation complex designed by the Russian Nevoske design bureau is expected anytime now," said an official.
The undocking is part of the second phase of work on the carrier, which is expected to be complete by 2017, when the basin trials will get under way
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PostPosted: Fri Jul 17, 2015 10:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

9 Indian shipyards shortlisted for next aircraft carrier

http://www.deccanherald.com/content/489845/9-indian-shipyards-shortlisted-next.html

Nine shipyards including four owned by private players have been shortlisted by the government to compete for building the next generation indigenous aircraft carrier for the Indian Navy which could be nuclear powered.
The naval headquarters has written a letter seeking expression of intent for participation in the project, the most expensive single platform under 'Make In India' initiative, to the shortlisted shipyards. They have been given a deadline of July 21 to respond, defence sources said.

The four private shipyards are L&T, Pipavav, ABG and Bharti. The public sector shipyards are Mazagon Docks Limited, Garden Reach Shipbuilder and Engineers, Hindustan Shipyards Limited, Cochin Shipyard Limited and Goa Shipyard Limited.

The government has set up a high-level study group, headed by Assistant Controller of Carrier Project Rear Admiral Surendra Ahuja to identify the suitable Indian shipyard and to arrive at a build strategy.

The proposed 65,000 tonne aircraft carrier will be India's biggest and longest. It will also carry on board over 50 aircraft.

The first indigenous aircraft carrier - 40,000 tonne INS Vikrant - being build by the Cochin Shipyard has the capacity to carry 30 aircraft. The 45,000 tonne INS Vikramaditya, bought from the Russians, has capacity of 34 aircraft.

According to the letter sent out to the shipyards, the warship could be either be nuclear-powered or conventional one using diesel and gas turbines.

It would have a catapult to launch fixed wing aircraft.
India has always used "ski-jump" at the end of the flight deck to fly the planes off the carrier.

This is one area where the US will come into play. India and US have set up a working group to collaborate on aircraft carrier technology after the visit of US President Barack Obama.

American Navy's latest carrier, the 100,000-tonne USS Gerald R Ford, which will be commissioned next year, is the world's only carrier featuring electromagnetic aircraft launch system" (EMALS).

This means that the aircraft will gain its take-off velocity through an electromagnetic rail gun instead of the conventional steam-driven catapults.

The letter by the Navy says that modern technology can be considered for catapult launch.

Comment: Does desi Navy needs such a white elephant? A few shore based air bases could do that job with lot less money!!
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PostPosted: Fri Jul 17, 2015 11:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

sabya99 wrote:
Comment: Does desi Navy needs such a white elephant? A few shore based air bases could do that job with lot less money!!
Sir, thanks for the update. As my Navy friends tell me, an aircraft carrier extends the reach of a Navy to no end, in a Blue Waters approach, which the Indian Navy is looking at, to be a force to reckon with in the region. An aircraft carrier will also be an amalgamation of numerous other indigenous technologies in development. Today's warfare may be a low-intensity skirmish, rather than an all-out battle. A heavily armed aircraft carrier will not only defend itself well, it will have sufficient power and range to be a successful threat deterrent. Shore-based air bases with A2A refuelling helps, but does not quite do the same role of an aircraft carrier (look at the sheer variety of sub-systems on board an aircraft carrier!), with the same level of panache.
Cheers, Sumantra.
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PostPosted: Wed Aug 12, 2015 7:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

23 Warships That Are Changing the Future Of Warfare.

War is changing and governments around the world are changing how they fight. As technology moves forward so does modern warfare. Here are 23 warships from the past, present and future, which are changing how wars are fought and won.

http://www.shockpedia.com/23-warships-that-are-changing-the-future-of-warfare/
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 31, 2015 6:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

What will Royal Navy warships look like in 2050?

Futuristic images of what Royal Navy vessels could look like in 2050 have been developed by young British scientists and engineers. They hope it will offer a glimpse of how advanced vessels could be.
A group of British scientists and engineers are working for major players in the industry and the Ministry of Defence on a project called Starpoint.
Its aim is to ensure that the UK remains at the forefront of military maritime technology.
A 3D holographic command table in the operations room could potentially allow the crew to rotate and zoom into the battlefield, viewing it from space or underwater.
An acrylic hull that can be turned translucent to give all-round visibility, laser and electro-magnetic weapons and a fleet of drones all built on board with a 3D printer are also possibilities for the fleet.

More : http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-34077719
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 10, 2015 5:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Navy 'thunder chest' on Konkan coast

http://www.telegraphindia.com/1150910/jsp/nation/story_41776.jsp#.VfF01dJViko

New Delhi, Sept 9: Surrounded by the green hills of the Malabar Coast on three sides and the blue waters of the Arabian Sea on the fourth, the Indian Navy's largest base INS Vajrakosh - "thunder chest" - was today commissioned by defence minister Manohar Parrikar.
"Missiles at INS Vajrakosh should always remain ready for operational deployment," said Parrikar.
Vajrakosh is part of "Project Seabird", conceived by the then navy chief, Admiral Oscar Dawson, in 1985 to de-congest Mumbai harbour and locate a naval base beyond the range of Pakistani fighter aircraft.
After delays, mostly because of environment issues and over resettlement of local inhabitants - a subject that Parrikar is familiar with having been chief minister of Goa - Vajrakosh, so called because it will be the repository of the navy's firepower, is now finally on stream.
Along with INS Kadamba that was commissioned in 2005, Vajrakosh will make for one of the largest military bases complete with two airstrips, submarine pens, a ship repair yard, a dry dock, jetties for two aircraft carriers and 50 warships. INS Kadamba has the only shiplift in the country - a giant platform that can lift ships up to 6,500 tonnes (all warships of the Indian Navy barring the aircraft carriers) and place them in a drydock.
The second phase of Project Seabird alone costs Rs 20,000 crore. The first cost Rs 5,000 crore.
The military base has come up along a fascinating coastline where the hills roll down to the sea. It has involved the acquisition of land in which coconut palms swayed gently and thousands of people had to be moved, their houses and temples razed in the North Karanataka district near the border with Goa.
A delegation of villagers met Parrikar after the commissioning and complained that they have not yet been compensated.
The navy chose the location for the natural defences the hills give it. Submarine pens - covered shelters for submarines that make them difficult to detect - are likely to be bored into the hillsides.
A similar base is in the works on the east coast. Called "Project Varsha", the navy plans to base most of its assets for the eastern seaboard a few kilometres south of Visakhapatnam that is currently the headquarters of the Eastern Naval Command. Project Varsha involves the resurrection of a Second World War airstrip built by the Americans at Rambili.
Defence ministry spokesperson Sitanshu Kar said Parrikar was briefed on the future expansion plans of Karwar Naval Base including a proposed air station. The navy wants the air base for its maritime surveillance P8i aircraft and as a base for its helicopters.
It was little wonder that Parrikar said Karwar would be one of the most environment-friendly establishments, given the recent history of displacement and development.
"Karwar will be one of the cleanest naval bases in the world with the least carbon footprint," he said.
In an official statement, the navy said units operating out of Karwar are required to be equipped with specialised armaments and missiles. These sophisticated missiles and ammunition require special storage facility and specialised servicing facilities.
INS Vajrakosh will have all the required infrastructure and is manned by specialists to meet these requirements.
"With the ongoing expansion of the Indian Navy, there has been an increase in the number of ships, submarines and aircraft equipped with specialised armament and missiles. These need to be stowed and maintained in the best possible manner throughout their service life," said the navy chief, Admiral Robin Dhowan.
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 02, 2015 6:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

INS Kochi, India's latest stealth warship, commissioned

http://www.thehindu.com/news/cities/mumbai/ins-kochi-to-be-commissioned-today/article7705575.ece

The ship incorporates new design concepts for improved survivability, stealth, seakeeping and manoeuvrability.
Naval warship INS Kochi was commissioned by Defence Minister Manohar Parrikar at the Naval Dockyard in Mumbai on Wednesday.
INS Kochi is the second ship of the Kolkata-class (Project 15A) Guided Missile Destroyers.
The warship is designed by the Navy’s in-house organisation, Directorate of Naval Design, and constructed by Mazagon Dock Ship builders Ltd. in Mumbai.
Although conceived as follow-on of the earlier Delhi class, the ship is vastly superior and has major advancements in weapons and sensors.
Enhanced stealth features
The ship incorporates new design concepts for improved survivability, stealth, seakeeping and manoeuvrability.
With a displacement of 7,500 tonnes, the ship spanning 164 metres in length and 17 metres at the beam, is propelled by four gas turbines and designed to achieve speeds in excess of 30 knots.
Enhanced stealth features have been achieved through shaping of hull and use of radar-transparent deck fittings.
A bow mounted sonar dome, the second of its kind in an indigenous naval platform, has been introduced to enhance sonar acoustic performance, a defence spokesperson said.
State-of-the-art weapons
INS Kochi is packed with an array of state-of-the-art weapons and sensors.
The ship includes a vertical launch missile system for long distance engagement of shore and sea-based targets.
The ship is the second in the Indian Navy to have Multi-Function Surveillance and Threat Alert Radar(MF-STAR) to provide target data to Long Range Surface to Air Missile system (LR-SAM).
The MF-STAR and LR-SAM systems were jointly developed by DRDO and Israel Aerospace Industries Ltd. To protect against incoming air borne and surface threats, at medium and close in range, the ship has 76 mm and 30 mm gun mounts.
Top features
1 INS Kochi weighs over 7500 tonnes and is designed to achieve speeds in excess of 30 knots.
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2 The ship is loaded with BrahMos surface-to- surface missile.
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3 It has 76 mm Super Rapid Gun Mount (SRGM) and AK 630 Close In Weapon System (CIWS) designed to take on air and surface targets.
________________________________________
4 INS Kochi's anti-submarine arsenal consists of Indigenous Rocket Launchers (IRL), Indigenous Twin-tube Torpedo Launchers (ITTL) and bow-mounted new generation HUMSA Sonar Dome.
________________________________________
5 It is equipped to operate two Sea King or Chetak helicopters.
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 27, 2015 8:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Second ASW corvette handed over to Navy by Kolkata shipyard

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/kolkata/Second-ASW-corvette-handed-over-to-Navy-by-Kolkata-shipyard/articleshow/49939362.cms


KOLKATA: The INS Kadmatt. second in a series of four Kamorta-class Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) Corvettes being built by the Garden Reach Shipbuilders and Engineers (GRSE) Ltd was handed over to the Navy in Kolkata on Thursday. This advanced weapons platform will formally be inducted into the Navy's Eastern Fleet in the next few days. The first ship of this class, the INS Kamorta, which was commissioned into the Navy on August 23, 2014, at Visakhapatnam, is already engaged in active service with the Eastern Fleet.

GRSE chairman cum managing director Rear Admiral (retd) A K Verma, who calls the INS Kadmatta a 'super-sophisticated' frontline warship, handed it over to commanding officer Cdr Mahesh C Moudgil in the presence of Rear Admiral Narayan Prasad, chief staff officer (technical), Eastern Naval Command and other senior officers of the Navy and GRSE.

"It is a known fact that warships of the People's Liberation Army Navy (PLAN) are foraging close to Indian territorial waters in the Bay of Bengal region. PLAN submarines are detected on a routine basis close to the Ten Degree Channel that separates Andamans from the Nicobar group of islands. On an average there are four contacts every three months. This is an attempt at muscle flexing and probing India's defences. The Chinese know that we are watching but that is only half of the job done. With ships like the INS Kamorta and INS Kadmatt on the prowl, China would also know that we have the capability to destroy in case of any mischief. India is developing her own submarine fleet but they will play a more offensive than defensive role. A submarine is not meant to protect a country's maritime interests," a senior naval officer said.

The Andamans has a tri-services command but no naval fleet though this has been the demand from several senior officers and strategists. For the moment, ships like the INS Kamorta and INS Kadmatt can patrol the Andamans Sea from their base at Visakhapatnam.

GRSE is building four ASW Corvettes under the Navy's Project P-28. The basic design for these ships was developed by the Navy's Directorate of Naval Design and the details were filled in by the in-house design department of GRSE, The INS Kadmatt is 109 metres long with a displacement of 3,200 tonnes. The ship has a maximum speed of 25 Knots, with an endurance of over 3,400 nautical miles at a speed of 18 knots. She is designed to accommodate 17 officers and 106 sailors and is armed with torpedoes and rocket launchers apart from a main gun. She also has excellent stealth features, both above and below the sea surface.

"These ships have an extremely low radiated underwater noise signature making them difficult to be detected by sonar, whilst the 'X' form of the hull and superstructure gives the ship a low radar cross section. The successful construction of ASW corvettes with advanced stealth features bears testimony to GRSE's growing capabilities in building state-of-the-art naval combatants, comparable with the best in the world. The ship has also been built with over 90% indigenous content and this is a major step towards achieving self-reliance in state of the art warship design and construction." Rear Admiral (retd) Verma said.
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PostPosted: Thu Dec 10, 2015 9:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

INS Vikramaditya to participate in exercise off Gujarat coast

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/kolkata/INS-Vikramaditya-to-participate-in-exercise-off-Gujaratcoast/articleshow/50096123.cms

KOLKATA: The Indian Air Force and Navy plan to re-enact an exercise performed off the northern coast of Gujarat nearly 40 years ago in the next few days. It will not only test the country's defences in the western front but also be an attempt to display India's strengths in the air and sea. Nearly 50 years ago, in September, 1965, the Pakistan Navy bombarded Dwarka in an attempt to shift focus from the raging air war that was taking a heavy toll on its aircraft. On that day, no Indian Navy ship was in a position to respond. Though there was no damage to the Somnath Temple or a radar station at Dwarka, Pakistan continues to gloat over 'Op Dwarka'.

"In 1965, Pakistan was already losing the war in the air and on land and it was a strategic decision not to engage the ships that bombarded Dwarka. Many Indian Navy ships of the Western Fleet were then being re-fitted or repaired. There was no point in reacting as the shelling did no damage and any shift of focus would have only served Pakistan's purpose. The exercise planned in the end of December has nothing to do with Dwarka. However, it will be somewhat similar to Ex Opposed Arrival that was held in 1976," a senior defence official said.

In 1976, India's first aircraft carrier INS Vikrant had participated in the exercise with other ships in its carrier group. This year, the INS Vikramaditya will take its place. The 44,500-tonne carrier along with accompanying ships will approach the Gujarat coast from the Gulf of Oman region. Air Force Station Jamnagar will have to react when the flotilla reaches Indian Territorial Waters and scramble fighter jets to meet the challenge. In 1976, Jamnagar had Mig-21s, Su-7s and Hunters. It is likely to send in Jaguar long-range maritime strike aircraft or even Su-30MKIs this time round. The Mig-29Ks on board the INS Vikramaditya will respond to the defence put up by the IAF.

"The idea is to test the level of preparedness and skills of our frontline ships and aircraft. The air force will treat the ships as an invading force while the carrier group will take on the land-based aircraft as aggressors in neutral waters. It will be an interesting exercise with a lot of learning for everybody," the official added.

The Naby has been taking the INS Vikramaditya through its paces ever since it was inducted. According to sources, there are still some issues with the boilers due to which nearly 40 Russian technicians continue to remain on board. After the exercise, the carrier is likely to sail for an overseas deployment before returning to the eastern coast in time for the Presidential Fleet Review at Visakapatnam in February, 2016.
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PostPosted: Wed Dec 16, 2015 7:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

More on Desi Navy :
Making of INS Vikranta (2) ; https://youtu.be/pc9kc87117Q

Desi Navy in action : https://youtu.be/VqKpsCJkLcE

It seems this desi flattop will be ready soon!
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PostPosted: Wed Dec 23, 2015 7:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

GRSE submarine-killers to add teeth to Navy fleet

Jayanta Gupta | TNN | Dec 23, 2015, 03.02 AM IST
http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/kolkata/GRSE-submarine-killers-to-add-teeth-to-Navy-fleet/articleshow/50290109.cms

The last two Kamorta-class Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) corvettes being built by Garden Reach Shipbuilders and Engineers (GRSE) Ltd would be potent platforms that would help the Navy further develop its capabilities in the Indian Ocean Region (IOR), said Vice-Admiral Satish Soni, flag officer commanding-in-chief, Eastern Naval Command.


"INS Kadmatt, the second ASW corvette of this class, will be commissioned soon and inducted in the eastern fleet. This is a state-of-the-art ship, on a par with the best in the world. The next two ships, INS Kiltan and INS Kavaratti, will be more advanced. The best part about these ships is that they have over 90% indigenous content. The Navy will take over greater responsibilities in the IOR. Whether it is aid to friendly nations or patrolling their Exclusive Economic Zones, the Navy will continue to play an important role in the region," Vice-Admiral Soni told TOI.

Lauding GRSE, the FOC-in-C pointed out how the Kolkata facility will build three advanced stealth frigates under the Navy's Project 17A. The Navy has ordered seven such frigates. The remaining four will be built by Mazagon Dock Shipbuilders Ltd.


The Kamorta-class corvettes are the first class of warships to be built with high-grade steel developed and made in India. This was a major leap towards indigenization. Till recently, India imported warship-grade steel from Russia. The need to develop high-grade steel for warships rose after a deal with Russia for supply for the indigenous aircraft carrier, INS Vikrant, fell through. Defence labs came up with a quality of steel better than the imported one. It was then made by SAIL plants and distributed to shipyards, including the one in Kochi where INS Vikrant is being built.


"This same steel was used to build INS Kamorta and the other ships in her class. All four vessels have an X-design hull for lower radar signature. The superstructures of INS Kiltan and Kavaratti are being built with composite material, which will reduce their weights and add to stealth capabilities. This is the first time a shipyard in India is experimenting with composite material, a technology developed in Sweden. The two ships will have more advanced features and modern armaments, making them more potent than the first two vessels," a senior Navy officer said.

Comment: Glad to see such a fine organization still exist in Kolkata. The city still making important contribution in country’s defense. Not all is lost!!
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PostPosted: Wed Dec 30, 2015 6:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

While you were sleeping, Navy tested and readied its missile shield
SUJAN DUTTA

New Delhi, Dec 30: The Indian Navy on Thursday claimed that it now has a much-needed missile defence shield for its frontline warships, following successful testing of an Indo-Israeli system.
A series of tests from the INS Kolkata in the Arabian Sea from the late evening of Tuesday to the early hours of Wednesday of an Indo-Israeli Long Range Surface to Air Missile (LRSAM), called the Barak NG, was successful, navy spokesperson Captain D.K. Sharma said.
The Barak NGs were fired at "expendable aerial targets" -- remotely piloted unmanned rockets -- in a repeat of the tests that were carried out from an Israeli warship in the Mediterranean Sea last month in the presence of Indian military scientists.
Scientists from India's Defence Research & Development Organisation (DRDO) and the Israel Aircraft Industry (IAI) were on board the INS Kolkata, the first of the latest series of stealth destroyers made in India.

The INS Kolkata is also the first to be armed with the capability to launch land-attack Brahmos missiles.
The LRSAM was tested at extended ranges, defence ministry spokesperson Nitin Wakankar said.
The Navy's Captain Sharma said the missile was tested with two firings at different ranges. The tests included a check on the tracking and guidance through the MF-STAR -- a multifunction active electronically scanned array naval radar.
The LR-SAM test and its declaration as a successful example of India-Israel defence cooperation comes as New Delhi and Tel Aviv are working out a calendar of events that will be highlighted by the visit of Prime Minister Narendra Modi.
Foreign minister Sushma Swaraj is likely to visit Israel in mid-Jamuary before a visit by the Prime Minister himself later in the year.
President Pranab Mukherjee visited Israel and Palestine last month.
The success of the LR-SAM programme has the potential to pitchfork India-Israel defence cooperation almost on a par with India-Russia ties as exemplified by the BrahMos cruise missile joint venture between New Delhi and Moscow.
The Kolkata class of warships will be armed with at least 32 LR-SAMs each. Each of the 47 warships on order by the Indian Navy in Indian shipyards will also be armed with the LR-SAM, also called the Barak 8 or the Barak NG (next generation).
The system may also provide missile shields for India’s offshore oil rigs.
http://www.telegraphindia.com/1151230/jsp/frontpage/story_61212.jsp#.VoPQNa4qzTo
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PostPosted: Mon Jan 25, 2016 8:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Inside a Russian cruiser: http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-35379098
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 09, 2016 7:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Might of Indian Navy 2016: http://www.thehindu.com/news/national/2016-international-fleet-review-in-pictures/article8202309.ece?homepage=true&ref=slideshow#im-image-12 ( Courtesy The Hindu )
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 07, 2016 7:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Fire onboard INS Viraat, sailor killed
New Delhi, March 7, 2016, PTI:

One sailor was killed and three others were injured after a fire broke out onboard India’s soon to be decommissioned aircraft carrier INS Viraat in Goa.

The ship reported incident of stream leak and a “minor fire” on one of the ship’s boiler rooms late this afternoon, a navy spokesperson said. While he claimed that the incident was quickly brought under control, four sailors sustained injuries while combating the fire. One of them, Chief Engineer Mechanic Ashu Singh was critical, having suffered smoke inhalation, the spokesperson said.

He was shifted to the Naval Hospital in Goa where he suffered a cardiac arrest and died, the official said, adding the other three are “under treatment and out of danger”.“Prima facie, it appears some insulating material in the boiler room caught fire from heat due to the stream leak. Investigation is underway,” the spokesperson said. ‘Viraat’, one of the two aircraft carrier that India is operating, is expected to sail back to Mumbai soon.

Earlier in the day, family members of the navy personnel visited the aircraft carrier, which will be decommissioned soon. The Navy said the fire incident happened when the ship had earthed the Goa harbour after the sortie.
Comment: How Navy will use such vintage ships ?

http://www.deccanherald.com/content/533095/fire-onboard-ins-viraat-sailor.html
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 25, 2016 9:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Replacement of Sea Harrier :

Mig 29K of Indian Navy over Indian Ocean : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mikoyan_MiG-29K#/media/File:Mikoyan_MiG-29K_of_the_Indian_Navy.jpg
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 22, 2016 7:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Inside INS Vikramaditya , Navy’s largest flat top : https://youtu.be/WD5IoDknuBA
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PostPosted: Thu Jun 23, 2016 6:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

INS Kochi, one of the largest warship built in India; inside look : https://youtu.be/MXgdSXBP6CQ
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 18, 2016 10:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Indian Warships visit Vladivostok, 27.06.2016 :

https://youtu.be/jjSZ9MToqCE
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PostPosted: Sat Sep 17, 2016 11:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Visakhapatnam-class destroyer - Wikipedia,
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Visakhapatnam-class_destroyer


The Visakhapatnam class (Project 15B) is a class of stealth guided missile destroyers currently being built for the Indian Navy. Based on the Kolkata-class design, the Visakhapatnam class will be an extensively improved version. Ordered in 2011, the first ship is expected to be completed in 2018.

More from Times of India ; http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/Mormugao-Indias-second-guided-missile-destroyer-launched-in-Mumbai/articleshow/54376958.cms
MUMBAI: An indigenously built warship equipped with a range of high-tech missiles was launched on Saturday with Navy chief Admiral Sunil Lanba+saying the stealth destroyer can be compared with the best vessels in the world.

Christened ' Mormugao ', the vessel has been built by government-runMazgaon Dock Shipbuilders Ltd (MDL) and belongs to Visakhapatnam class of ships being constructed under Project 15B.

The Project 15B missile destroyers are modern warships equipped with the latest weapons package in continuation of the lineage of the highly successful Delhi and Kolkata Class ships.

Admiral Lanba's wife Reena launched the bedecked ship at a function at MDL here at 11.58am and it was released into the Arabian Sea for the first time. The vessel will undergo certain testings required by Indian Navy and would be subsequently known as INS Mormugao.

Four more such destroyers would be built and delivered by MDL+ during 2020-2024, the PSU said in a statement.

The first ship of the Visakhapatnam class was launched on April 20, 2015.

Mormugao has a displacement of 7,300 tonne with maximum speed of over 30 knots. The warship is equipped with surface- to-surface missiles, surface-to-air missiles and anti-submarine rocket launchers. It is also capable of carrying two anti-submarine warfare helicopters.
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 16, 2016 6:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Indian Navy targets to induct indigenously built aircraft carrier by 2018

http://www.ibtimes.co.in/indian-navy-targets-induct-indigenously-built-aircraft-carrier-by-2018-693795


Amid reports of China's first indigenously built aircraft carrier nearing completion, the Indian Navy now plans to induct the home-grown Vikrant-class aircraft carrier Indigenous Aircraft Carrier (IAC-1 or INS Vikrant) by 2018.
As the Navy aims to transform itself into a true blue-water naval force, it expands its role to protect commercial and strategic Indian interests in the Indian Ocean Region (IOR) and beyond.
Vice Admiral G S Pabby (Controller Warship Production and Acquisition) told reporters on Wednesday that the Navy is considering to have a 212 ship strong fleet by 2027 and is working hard in this direction, PTI reported.
He further added that the Navy is "seriously considering" to have a second aircraft carrier, dubbed IAC-2 or INS Vishal. Currently, the second ship is in its "concept" stage, he revealed.
The IAC-2 is expected to be a 65,000 tonner with Electromagnetic Aircraft Launch System (EMALS) CATOBAR system.
With deepening defence co-operation with the U.S., India hopes to "draw" from U.S. experiences and signed Information Exchange Annex with it, which is expected to aid the Indian Navy's IAC-1 project.
The report noted the visit of senior U.S. Navy officials to Cochin to help them sort out issues with IAC-1. The IAC-1 is being built at Cochin Shipyard. The Navy said that 99 percent of hull work of IAC-1 is completed and also briefed about the status of Mine Countermeasures Vessels (MCMV) and Landing Platform Docks (LDP).
Vice Admiral Pabby said a contract for the "badly needed" minesweepers is expected to be signed very soon and they have finalised issues related to technology transfer from the foreign collaborators. India has been in discussion with Kanganam Corporation, a South Korean shipyard in this direction. India has a requirement of 12 such vessels costing Rs. 32,000 crore. These vessels are expected to be built in India at Goa Shipyard Limited (GSL), based in Vasco, Goa.
Recently, GSL went ahead with the purchase of weapons and sensor suite for the 12 minesweepers that are yet to be constructed.
Meanwhile, the Navy carried out technical evaluation for the Landing Platform Docks (LDP) project with issues in capacity assessment cropping up. But Vice Admiral Pabby assured that these are in the final stages.
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 26, 2016 12:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

A flotilla of Russian warships including flattop Adm. Kuznetsov passing through English Channel being shadowed by Royal Navy frigates. ( BBC news ).
http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-37725327
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PostPosted: Sun Dec 25, 2016 11:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

China's first aircraft carrier in Western Pacific drill.
http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-38431999

China's first aircraft carrier has set off to the Western Pacific, the navy says, describing the departure as part of routine exercises.
It is the first time the Liaoning has been deployed to "distant sea waters", state media report.
Details of the location, route or duration of the drill have not been given.
The exercise comes amid renewed tension over self-ruled Taiwan, which Beijing sees as a breakaway province.
"A Chinese navy formation, including the aircraft carrier Liaoning, headed towards the West Pacific on Saturday for scheduled blue-water training," Chinese state news agency Xinhua reported, quoting navy spokesperson Liang Yang. (More)
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