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New Indian aircraft carrier.
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sabya99
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 14, 2013 7:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wait over: INS Vikramaditya set to join Indian Navy on Nov. 16New Delhi, Nov 14, 2013, (PTI)

http://www.deccanherald.com/content/368932/wait-over-ins-vikramaditya-set.html

Defence Minister AK Antony will induct the long-delayed aircraft carrier INS Vikramaditya, designed to boost India's maritime capabilities, at a shipyard in Russia on Saturday.

Antony will leave for Russia tomorrow with a high-level delegation, including Defence Secretary RK Mathur, on a four-day visit during which, apart from commissioning the aircraft carrier, he will also co-chair the India–Russia Inter -Governmental Commission on Military Technical Cooperation (IRIGC-MTC) with his Russian counterpart, Sergey Shoigu.

Contracted for in 2004, during the NDA regime, the vessel has been delayed by over five years and has seen several time and cost-overruns in the last nine years.
"The commissioning ceremony will take place at Sevmash Shipyard, Severodvinsk, on Saturday and the IRIGC-MTC meeting will take place in Moscow on Monday," a Defence Ministry release said.

Russian Deputy Prime Minister Dmitry Rogozin will be attending the commissioning along with Defence Minister Shoigu.

For the IRIGC-MTC, Antony's delegation includes Secretary (Defence Production) GC Pati, DG (Acquisition) SB Agnihotri, and senior officers of the armed forces.

At the meet, the two sides will discuss a broad spectrum of issues related to ongoing and proposed defence projects and defence cooperation between the two countries.
The two sides will also exchange views on bilateral concerns related to regional and global issues, the release said.

INS Vikramaditya is a Kiev class aircraft carrier which was commissioned by Russian Navy in 1987 under the name Baku. It was later renamed as Admiral Gorshkov and last sailed in 1995 in Russia, before being offered to India.

In Indian Navy, the 44,500 tonne warship with a length of 284m will have MiG-29K naval combat aircraft along with Kamov 31 and Kamov 28 anti-submarine warfare and maritime surveillance helicopters.

The MiG 29-Ks would provide a significant boost to Indian Navy with their range of over 700 nautical miles, extendable to over 1,900 n.m. with mid-air refuelling, and an array of weapons like anti-ship missiles, beyond visual range air-to- air missiles and guided bombs and rockets.

It will also have a complement of indigenously-built and developed ALH Dhruv choppers along with SeaKing helicopters.

With over 1,600 personnel on board, INS Vikramaditya would literally be a 'floating City' with a mammoth logistical requirement of nearly a lakh of eggs, 20,000 litres of milk and 16 tonnes of rice per month.

"With a complete stock of provisions, she (the vessel) is capable of sustaining herself at sea for a period of about 45 days.

"With a capacity of over 8,000 tonnes of load, she is capable of operations up to a range of over 7,000 nautical miles or 13,000km," a Navy release said.

The ship is powered by eight boilers and can achieve top speeds of 30 knots per hour.
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 15, 2013 12:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

HAWK21M wrote:
Any one have the navy comparisms in terms of approx equipment numbers of the top 5.


This might be useful. http://www.globalfirepower.com
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sabya99
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 15, 2013 7:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

sukritmunjal wrote:
HAWK21M wrote:
Any one have the navy comparisms in terms of approx equipment numbers of the top 5.


This might be useful. http://www.globalfirepower.com

Thanks for posting. Thats a useful site!
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PostPosted: Sun Nov 17, 2013 3:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

sukritmunjal wrote:
HAWK21M wrote:
Any one have the navy comparisms in terms of approx equipment numbers of the top 5.


This might be useful. http://www.globalfirepower.com


Thanks.
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sabya99
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 19, 2013 11:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

INS Vikramaditya may have been snooped by NATO allies

New Delhi, Nov 19, 2013, (PTI)
http://www.deccanherald.com/content/369880/ins-vikramaditya-may-have-been.html

Aircraft carrier INS Vikramaditya may have been snooped by a surveillance aircraft belonging to one of the NATO countries when it was undergoing sea trials in Russia.

The aircraft carrier may have been snooped by an American-origin P-3C Orion surveillance aircraft belonging to the NATO nations, sources said.

They, however, said the warship was with the Russian Navy when the P-3C Orion flew close to it during the sea trials.

INS Vikramaditya has generated a lot of interest in the global navies and a lot of them, including both friends and adversaries, want to know about its capabilities and strengths.
The warship was handed to the Indian Navy on Saturday at the Sevmash shipyard Russia after a delay of more than five years.

The warship, which is without any air defence missile system, is being escorted by a group of frigates and tanker ships to bring it here at its home base in Karwar in Karnataka.

The escorting warships are also expected to protect it form any snooping attempt and other such measures.
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 20, 2013 10:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Why couldn't a few Indian Navy Mig-29Ks have been stationed on the carrier while it was in Russia? Were there logistical/technical issues in flying the Navy Mig-29Ks to Russia?

The fighters form the most important component of the carrier, and without them on board, it is a sitting duck!
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 21, 2013 7:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

vivekman wrote:

The fighters form the most important component of the carrier, and without them on board, it is a sitting duck!


Not exactly Vivek. Actually fighters are the offensive component. Aircraft carriers are usually accompanied by a carrier battle group, which is responsible for defence of the carrier. A carrier also has a self protection suite for its defence.

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PostPosted: Fri Nov 22, 2013 9:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

shivendrashukla wrote:
Not exactly Vivek. Actually fighters are the offensive component. Aircraft carriers are usually accompanied by a carrier battle group, which is responsible for defence of the carrier. A carrier also has a self protection suite for its defence.
Cheers
Shivendra


True, but I think having the fighters on board (and on operational readiness) would serve as a deterrent for rogue offensive/surveillance aircraft looking to buzz the carrier.

Any reasons why the fighters (at least a few of them) were not stationed on the carrier when it was handed over at Severodvinsk?
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PostPosted: Sun Nov 24, 2013 1:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

vivekman wrote:

True, but I think having the fighters on board (and on operational readiness) would serve as a deterrent for rogue offensive/surveillance aircraft looking to buzz the carrier.



When metre resolution spy satellites are now available, I wonder why anyone would use a P-3C to spy on an behemoth like an aircraft carrier.

P-3Cs are mostly used for anti-submarine ops, and to snoop on smaller craft.
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PostPosted: Sun Nov 24, 2013 9:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think it was more of an attempt to get some frequency signatures of devices operating in other bands of the electromagnetic spectrum, on the ship. There is not much one can make out visually on a bland aircraft carrier deck. I also doubt if the Captain would leave sensitive equipment on, since many AEW aircraft can pick up signals from many miles away. I really doubt if the Orions got anything useful.
Cheers, Sumantra.
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PostPosted: Wed Dec 04, 2013 10:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Vikrant on e-auction, Eagle sad

http://www.telegraphindia.com/1131204/jsp/nation/story_17641838.jsp

Mumbai, Dec. 3: Over 16 years after its decommissioning, the aircraft carrier Vikrant is all set to be on sale in an e-auction by the defence ministry later this month. And no one is sadder than the Grey Eagle.
Confirming reports that the Indian Museum Ship (IMS) Vikrant would now be auctioned, Vice Admiral Shekhar Sinha, the flag officer commanding-in-chief of Western Naval Command, said: “It is sad, but true. The e-auctioning process has been initiated.”
Speaking to reporters on board INS Viraat on the eve of Navy Day, Vice Admiral Sinha said: “Personally, I am sad as I was among the last officers to have flown on board Vikrant.”
Decorated as the Grey Eagle — the longest serving naval aviator — Sinha was also part of the historic formal handover of the new, refurbished aircraft carrier INS Vikramaditya by Russia last month.
The navy had continued to manage the Vikrant after it was decommissioned in 1997 and re-christened as an Indian Museum Ship to be preserved as a permanent museum berthed off the Mumbai coast.
“But now the state government has made it clear that they cannot support her further. So, the MoD (ministry of defence) has decided to put her up for auction,” said an emotional Sinha.
MSTC Ltd, a subsidiary of SAIL, initiated the e-auctioning process last month. The ship has been kept open for inspections by prospective bidders at Vikrant Jetty in the naval dockyard from November 26 to December 14.
Bidders have been asked to deposit a pre-bid earnest deposit of Rs 3.10 crore. The final bid for IMS Vikrant will open on the MSTC e-commerce bidding site at noon on December 18 and close the same day at 4pm.
The 1943 British-built Royal Navy ship HMS Hercules was sold to India in 1957, and was commissioned by the Indian Navy as INS Vikrant in 1961. It played a pivotal role in the 1971 India-Pakistan war and was decommissioned after 36 years of service.
It had been decided to permanently berth IMS Vikrant off Oyster Rock near the Radio Club near the Gateway of India in South Mumbai.
Maharashtra Urban Infrastructure Development Company Ltd was chosen as the agency to implement the maritime museum project in 2008. However, over the years, the project ran into rough weather.
In the past few years, the navy would open the ship to visitors, especially schoolchildren, on special occasions. But now its fate is uncertain, and the ship could well head for a scrapyard.
Asked about her fate, Vice Admiral Sinha said: “You would have to ask the bidders.”
He, however, hoped that a bidder could convert the ship into a museum.
If a bidder does convert it into a museum, Vice Admiral Sinha said, the Indian Navy would provide all possible help because of Vikrant’s sheer “emotional value”.
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 05, 2014 1:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

INS Vikramaditya enters Indian Navy's area of operation

http://www.thehindu.com/news/national/ins-vikramaditya-enters-indian-navys-area-of-operation/article5538226.ece?homepage=true

It was a sight to behold. As India’s newest aircraft carrier INS Vikramaditya entered the Indian Navy’s area of operation in north western Arabian Sea, accompanied by three other vessels, it was rendezvoused — in Naval parlance RVed — with the Western Fleet that had gone all the way from Mumbai to receive it.
INS Vikramaditya, which was accompanied by INS Trikand, which is a Talwar class frigate, INS Delhi which is a Delhi class destroyer and INS Deepak, the fleet tanker, fired ceremonial guns to salute the flag of the fleet commander Rear Admiral Anand Chawla, who was leading the flotilla of the Western Fleet, that also comprised aircraft carrier INS Viraat.
The other ships besides INS Viraat which had gone to receive INS Vikramaditya included two Delhi class destroyers, three Trishul class stealth frigates, a Godavari class frigate and a couple of offshore vessels.
All this happened about 1200 nautical miles from the country's shores on New Year’s eve and thereafter all the aircraft carriers, frigates and destroyers together set sail for India.
INS Vikramaditya, which was commissioned into the Indian Navy on November 16 last at the North Russian shipyard of Sevmash at Severodvinsk, is now headed for its home port at Karwar in Karnataka where it is scheduled to reach in a week’s time.
Commanded by Captain Suraj Berry, INS Vikramaditya -- which took eight years to refurbish at the Russian yard -- would reach Karwar on completing a near 8500 nautical mile journey.
On reaching Karwar, the aircraft carrier would re-equip and prepare and get ready for the next phase which would be its integration with the air wing, comprising about 30 Mig 29K aircraft and six Kamov Ka-31 “Helix” reconnaissance and anti-submarine helicopters.
It would take around four to six months for the full integration of the aircraft carrier after which it will become the spearhead of the carrier battle group. During this period, the aircraft carrier would also be equipped with surface-to-air missile (SAM) and close-in weapon system (CIWS) to safeguard it from aerial attack.
At the time of commissioning of INS Vikramaditya Indian Navy Chief Admiral D.K. Joshi had indicated that Indian naval fighter pilots would be certified to carry out flying operations from the carrier deck within weeks of the carrier’s arrival in India.
While a batch of combat fliers from ‘Black Panther’ squadron has undertaken simulator training in Moscow, before the flying operations from the carrier deck, they are also scheduled to perfect take-off and landing on the shore-based test facility (SBTF) at INS Hansa in Goa.
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 05, 2014 5:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote















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PostPosted: Sun Jan 05, 2014 6:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If only there was an option to like the post above.
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 05, 2014 6:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wow, what a sight, what a sight! Dr. Ganguly, thanks for keeping us abreast of all this information, and Shukla-ji, for these lovely pictures!
Cheers, Sumantra.
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 05, 2014 10:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

shivendrashukla wrote:


Thanks for sharing those pictures. Great ones, those!

Vikramaditya seems much longer than Virat, going by the pics. I wonder if modified Do-228s can be operated from it on COD (Carrier On Board Delivery) duties, much like the US Navy's Grumman C-2 Greyhounds?

Apparently, two of Indian Navy's Do-228s are being modified as maritime surveillance platforms. It would be useful if one of them could be stationed on board the Vikramaditya, providing early warning capabilities to the MIG-29Ks.
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PostPosted: Mon Jan 06, 2014 9:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Brilliant photos!

The Vikramaditya looks imposing. It will look even more deadly once the Mig-29Ks come on board...

Congratulations to the Navy!
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PostPosted: Mon Jan 06, 2014 6:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Looks neat. Well done and congratulations to the Navy.
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PostPosted: Mon Jan 06, 2014 7:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://youtu.be/olJopSrK0O0

some more...
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PostPosted: Mon Jan 06, 2014 9:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

What a majestic sight! Two desi flattops sailing side by side , prowling the Arabian Sea. Could anyone thought of this a few decades ago! Thanks Mr.Shukla for the pictures and video
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PostPosted: Mon Jan 06, 2014 10:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If Pakistan and China claim that the balance of power in the Indian ocean has shifted, they aren't exactly wrong. Aircraft carriers have their own detractors, but I guess the Vikramaditya based from Karwar, will be a force to reckon with. This is a subtle bit more distance from Karachi, and with the awesome Mig-29K and the KA-31 Helix early warning choppers are more than a force to reckon with. From the relative safety of my armchair, I am delighted that India did not go for the bigger Su-33 variant from the start: the Russians also now want the Mig-29K to replace their Su-33s, vindicating India's decision to go in for a smaller, leaner and meaner bird. Delays and cost-over-runs aside, the Vikramaditya is an awesome force multiplier. Naval aviation pilots often tease their Air Force counterparts in saying that they need to `successfully crash-land on the carrier each time with little margin of error even in choppy seas, and save the public exchequer's money as well'. The video that Shukla-ji shared has at least a large part of it shot from a HAL Chetak, the Alouette SAIII which India has maintained so wonderfully. The numerous Harrier fly-pasts were a treat for the senses. Kudos to the Navy for using these birds, which are extremely difficult to maintain. The reception which Vikramaditya got is just indicative of the importance India assigns to this ship. Amazing!
Cheers, Sumantra.
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 07, 2014 1:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes,Sumantra as always you are right. Carriers are force multipliers no matter which type of aircraft they operate. Vikrant with its vintage Breguet Alize aircraft completely blocked East Pakistan escape routes during 1971 Bangladesh Liberation war. I think Vikramaditya with its Mig-29 could do lot more. But for Karachi harbor and Makran coast subsurface assets will be very important than a flattop. India should build up its submarine assets now. Very Happy
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 10, 2014 4:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Impressive pics.....
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 16, 2014 7:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Vikramaditya firing trial : http://youtu.be/iPeEItcREGE

Comment: why a carrier needs to fire antisub rockets when it is usually sanitized miles away by its surface escorts.

Mig-29KUB operation from Vikramaditya flight deck : http://youtu.be/fDuf8INbmXg
Mig-29 KUB operation of Indian Navy : http://youtu.be/_98KlEqxnZ4
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 16, 2014 9:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the updates, Dr. Ganguly.
sabya99 wrote:
Comment: why a carrier needs to fire antisub rockets when it is usually sanitized miles away by its surface escorts.
It is only in movies that a submarine comes beautifully on the radar of ships and aircraft. It is very difficult to detect submarines almost unless it is directly underneath, by which time one is already done for. Whatever means it takes to detect and neutralise a submarine, has to be used.
Cheers, Sumantra.
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 17, 2014 8:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

sumantra wrote:
Thanks for the updates, Dr. Ganguly.
sabya99 wrote:
Comment: why a carrier needs to fire antisub rockets when it is usually sanitized miles away by its surface escorts.
It is only in movies that a submarine comes beautifully on the radar of ships and aircraft. It is very difficult to detect submarines almost unless it is directly underneath, by which time one is already done for. Whatever means it takes to detect and neutralise a submarine, has to be used.
Cheers, Sumantra.


@ Sumantra, modern subs could attack targets from miles away. During Falkland war (1982) British submarine Challenger attacked Argie heavy cruiser from a distance of 25 miles . Two wire guided torpedoes were fired ,one missed other sunk the cruiser. Challenger immediately took evasive action and disappeared in deeper water in South sea. In such a scenario what good the antisub rocket of Vikramaditya will do? Most western carrier ( CVN ) don’t carry any weapons other than chaff distributors and Gatling guns for close support. However having Klub missile on board Vikramaditya will be an asset. Very Happy
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 17, 2014 10:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

sabya99 wrote:
@ Sumantra, modern subs could attack targets from miles away.
I didn't write much terribly different, Sir! However, having more ammo is not too harmful: any security is nice. Please read, below.
sabya99 wrote:
During Falkland war (1982)...
I too had followed this war with some interest. There are two points of particular interest in this discussion.
- Argentina under Gen Leopoldo Galtileiri (if my memory serves me right) had fired some French Exocet misslles from their Skyhawk aircraft at the HMS Invincible, and claimed some damage. It is interesting that the HMS Invincible, which only had limited defences, was refitted with more powerful armament after this experience. Hence my point about `more ammo not being too harmful'.
- Second, the HMS Invincible was accompanied by the Hermes, now INS Virat.
Cheers, Sumantra.
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PostPosted: Sat Jan 18, 2014 8:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

sumantra wrote:
sabya99 wrote:
@ Sumantra, modern subs could attack targets from miles away.
I didn't write much terribly different, Sir! However, having more ammo is not too harmful: any security is nice. Please read, below.
sabya99 wrote:
During Falkland war (1982)...
I too had followed this war with some interest. There are two points of particular interest in this discussion.
- Argentina under Gen Leopoldo Galtileiri (if my memory serves me right) had fired some French Exocet misslles from their Skyhawk aircraft at the HMS Invincible, and claimed some damage. It is interesting that the HMS Invincible, which only had limited defences, was refitted with more powerful armament after this experience. Hence my point about `more ammo not being too harmful'.
- Second, the HMS Invincible was accompanied by the Hermes, now INS Virat.
Cheers, Sumantra.


@Sumantra, during the Falkland war Brit carriers operated well outside the range of Argie land based aircrafts. If I remember correctly they were about 200-250 miles north by north east of Falkland island and under no condition under the threat of direct Argie air attack. Argies had only six Exocet missile. Two were used two knock out Brit destroyer HMS Sheffield with one missed the target and other had a direct hit. But in any case Argie air force did not dare to fly above the radar horizon as they were afraid of British Sea Dart/ Sea Cat missile. In fact at later state the tiny Brit naval air squadron established total air supremacy over the war zone and Hawker Harriers jump jets did their job they were supposed to do ! I am sure no Brit carrier sustained any damage from Argie air force missile or bombs. But turbulent south Atlantic damaged them. After the destruction of destroyer Sheffield naval thinking all around the world changed drastically. Gatling guns were installed all over the war ships as point defense system against sea skimming missile including large CVNs.
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PostPosted: Sat Jan 18, 2014 8:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

sabya99 wrote:
@Sumantra, during the Falkland war Brit carriers operated well outside the range of Argie land based aircrafts...After the destruction of destroyer Sheffield naval thinking all around the world changed drastically. Gatling guns were installed all over the war ships as point defense system against sea skimming missile including large CVNs.
Thanks for the heads-up, Sir. I cannot trust my memories completely, I guess. However, the addition of attack ammo to beef up the HMS Invincible was indeed after the Falklands war. Thanks for the details! did you follow this from NJ? I followed this from whatever news came to us in newspapers, since we did not have a TV then.
Cheers, Sumantra.
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 19, 2014 6:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

sumantra wrote:
sabya99 wrote:
@Sumantra, during the Falkland war Brit carriers operated well outside the range of Argie land based aircrafts...After the destruction of destroyer Sheffield naval thinking all around the world changed drastically. Gatling guns were installed all over the war ships as point defense system against sea skimming missile including large CVNs.
Thanks for the heads-up, Sir. I cannot trust my memories completely, I guess. However, the addition of attack ammo to beef up the HMS Invincible was indeed after the Falklands war. Thanks for the details! did you follow this from NJ? I followed this from whatever news came to us in newspapers, since we did not have a TV then.
Cheers, Sumantra.


I was in New York City at that time. There was good coverage of the war in ABC,NBC, CBS and PBS. I don’t know how it was covered in India. Here are some of the clips from the you tube:
Falkland war documentary:
http://youtu.be/2FGWz7NFQnU
BBC documentary on the Falkland war 1982 : http://youtu.be/_XsI8CkwU64 ; http://youtu.be/1XAGzjAMAZ8 ; http://youtu.be/40knj0qg_Us ; http://youtu.be/c-_l3ezW0l4
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 19, 2014 11:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks a lot, Sir!
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 24, 2014 5:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

sabya99 wrote:
Yes,Sumantra as always you are right. Carriers are force multipliers no matter which type of aircraft they operate. Vikrant with its vintage Breguet Alize aircraft completely blocked East Pakistan escape routes during 1971 Bangladesh Liberation war.


I don't think the Berguet Alize was vintage in 1971. They were only little more then ten years old.

and Pakistan's navy back then was a joke. We could have trashed them even without the Vikrant.
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 24, 2014 9:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The_Goat wrote:
sabya99 wrote:
Yes,Sumantra as always you are right. Carriers are force multipliers no matter which type of aircraft they operate. Vikrant with its vintage Breguet Alize aircraft completely blocked East Pakistan escape routes during 1971 Bangladesh Liberation war.


I don't think the Berguet Alize was vintage in 1971. They were only little more then ten years old.

and Pakistan's navy back then was a joke. We could have trashed them even without the Vikrant.


@The Goat; Alize aircrafts were poorly armed against modern sidewinder missile equipped Saber jets. That’s why I used the term ‘vintage” . One such encounter took place in 1971 war over Coxbazar port ; the aircraft lost but pilot bailed out. Alizes are antisub aircrafts and not supposed to work in contested airspace.

More about Breguet Alize : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Breguet_Aliz%C3%A9
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 11, 2014 12:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Antony asks Navy chief about glitches in Vikramaditya

http://www.deccanherald.com/content/385601/antony-asks-navy-chief-glitches.html

Defence Minister A K Antony today asked the Navy to give a clear picture about reports that its largest warship INS Vikramaditya had suffered glitches during its voyage from Russia to India.

Navy Chief Admiral DK Joshi met Antony in his office and is learnt to have clarified on the issue, Defence Ministry officials said here.

The Navy Chief, it is learnt, told the minister that no major glitches were faced by the over Rs 12,000 crore warship during its journey to India.
According to reports, the long-delayed aircraft carrier had suffered a boiler breakdown during its 42-day journey, compromising the warship's ability to cut through choppy seas at a top speed of up to 56 kmph.

The vessel delivery to India was delayed by more than a year after problems occurred in its boilers during sea trials in Russia in 2011.

During the voyage of Vikramaditya to India from Russia, the Navy Headquarters was not happy with the activities of officers on board the ships escorting it to India as they had put up the aircraft carrier and the fleet warships on social media.

The Navy headquarters has also ordered an inquiry into the episode as this was the violation of guidelines and rules banning revelation of service-related details on such websites.
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 11, 2014 12:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
During the voyage of Vikramaditya to India from Russia, the Navy Headquarters was not happy with the activities of officers on board the ships escorting it to India as they had put up the aircraft carrier and the fleet warships on social media.


Ouch.
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 14, 2014 11:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mig-29K Trial on Vikramaditya : http://youtu.be/GR502tKJ9Qo
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 08, 2014 7:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

STOBAR landing of Mig 29 on Vikramaditya: http://youtu.be/Y52rsS_kquc
On the flight deck of Vikramaditya : http://youtu.be/P6rxE_Slf6s
Fly past Vikramaditya flight deck : http://youtu.be/B0B5zP3Ep2w
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PostPosted: Wed May 07, 2014 7:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

INS Vikramaditya is operationally deployed: Navy Chief

Kochi, May 7, 2014, PTI:
http://www.deccanherald.com/content/404966/ins-vikramaditya-operationally-deployed-navy.html

India's largest warship -- aircraft carrier INS Vikramaditya, is "operationally deployed" along with its fleet of MiG 29K combat aircraft, Navy chief Admiral Robin Dhowan said here today.

"The navy has inducted aircraft carrier INS Vikramaditya which is now operationally deployed with MiG- 29K aircraft embarked and being flown by Indian naval pilots," he told reporters here.

The 44,500-tonne aircraft carrier procured from Russia at a cost of USD 2.33 billion had arrived in India in January this year and is stationed at its home-base in Karwar in Karnataka.

Navy sources said the aircraft carrier has already taken part in one of the war games conducted recently by the Western Navy.
The aircraft carrier, which does not have air defence guns, is expected to get its weaponry for protection against aerial attacks at its scheduled first refit, they said.

Highlighting the list of capabilities and platforms to be acquired by the Navy in the near future, Dhowan said the first indigeneously built aircraft carrier christened INS Vikrant being built at the Cochin shipyard, will be ready for trials in 2017 and for delivery by 2018-end.

He said the force has already inducted nuclear attack submarine INS Chakra, the P-8I long range reconnaissance and anti-submarine warfare aircraft along with the Shivalik class frigates among others, he said.
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PostPosted: Thu Jun 05, 2014 6:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Safety scare on Gorshkov

SUJAN DUTTA

New Delhi, June 4: A new fighter jet of the Indian Navy was partly damaged after a “hard landing” on the deck of the INS Vikramaditya today, less than a month after the aircraft carrier was declared “fully operational”.
The carrier — earlier called Admiral Gorshkov — and the aircraft were bought with a lot of taxpayer money and after years of delay.
The incident calls to question a history of tardiness in procurement of weapons-platforms, combined with challenges thrown to Arun Jaitley, who has succeeded A.K. Antony as defence minister.
Antony was the longest-serving defence minister. There were more recorded mishaps in his tenure than in any other minister’s, barring V.K. Krishna Menon’s in 1962.
Navy sources described today’s incident as a “hard landing” to distinguish it from a crash. The nose wheel of the jet, a MiG29K — also procured from Russia like the Vikramaditya — is said to have been partly damaged. The MiG29K has tandem cockpits. Both pilots are safe, navy sources said.
The incident happened off the coast of Goa late this afternoon. The aircraft had taken off from the INS Hansa naval air station at Dabolim, where it is shore-based, and was to land on the Vikramaditya in manoeuvres that the vessel and its aircraft have been engaged in since May 7. That was when navy chief Admiral Robin Dhowan announced the carrier was fully operational with its combat aircraft integrated.
The navy last week reshuffled its top brass after accidents on its ships and submarines were followed by the resignation of then chief Admiral D.K. Joshi and the supersession of the chief of its western command, Vice Admiral Shekhar Sinha.
Since then, the government and the navy itself are taking a harder look at the country’s armada.
Even if the potential for damage to a carrier and its aircraft is great, “hard landings” are not all that infrequent because of the complex techniques involved in landing and take-off from a sailing ship.
The MiG29K is designed to land on the Vikramaditya with a tail-hook that has to be trapped in one of three arrester cables on the deck that will force the jet to come to a stop. (Just imagine a sprinter being forced to stop by a tape that cannot be breached, many times over). But the pilots of the jet cannot cut power so much that the aircraft may not be able to take off if the tail-hook fails to trap the arresters.
Navy sources said that in the waters off Goa this evening, the MiG29K failed to “trap” the first two arrester cables but took the third.
That caused the “hard landing” because the pilots were powering up (increasing throttle) to take-off after having missed the first two cables.
Apparently, the shock of the trap and the landing was so much that the nose of the aircraft pointed skywards before the plane dropped down on its nose wheel. The impact damaged the nose wheel. The arrester cables force the aircraft to stop on landing, bringing the aircraft from a speed of about 300kmph to zero in fractions of a second.
The INS Vikramaditya cost the Indian taxpayer $2.35 billion (around Rs 15,000cr).
The twin-engine MiG29K was originally part of a package deal with Russia along with the Gorshkov. India has contracted 45 MiG29K aircraft for $2.4 billion (Rs 14,232cr). A total of 27 of the aircraft have been delivered.
The Vikramaditya sailed from Russia and reached the Indian waters in January this year, five years behind schedule.
Because of the delay, the MiG29K pilots of the Indian Navy were trained at facilities in the US and at a Goa shore-based platform that simulates take-off and landing requirements at INS Hansa, the station in Dabolim.
But more than the technology, the technicalities and rigorous training methods required to operate aircraft from carriers, the Indian Navy and the Indian defence establishment are concerned with the resonance of mishaps and accidents on its top brass and their political leadership.
In the tenure of Antony, the military was always confused between what was politically correct and what was operationally desirable.
For Jaitley, who has succeeded Antony, this is a period of intense study with sharper focus on taxpayer money as he is also the finance minister.
This weekend, Jaitley is scheduled to travel to Mumbai and visit the only other aircraft carrier, the INS Viraat, which is being recycled several times over to meet the navy’s requirements.
Source : http://www.telegraphindia.com/1140605/jsp/nation/story_18480701.jsp#.U5Bsw3JdWGM
Comments: Carrier deck landing ( both day and night ) is one of the most demanding job Navy has. It requires significant training and lot of investment.
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 16, 2014 6:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://www.telegraphindia.com/1140616/jsp/nation/story_18516778.jsp#.U57j_JRdWGM

Smell paint, taste gulab jamun
‘Boxer with 10 long hands’ PM visited


SUJAN DUTTA

Goa, June 15: The INS Vikramaditya, India’s most modern and largest warship, smells of fresh paint. American super-carriers such as the USS Nimitz, on which this correspondent has sailed, smell of aviation turbine fuel and grease.
The INS Vikramaditya, during Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s day at sea yesterday, was mostly quiet but for the chop-chop of Seaking and Dhruv helicopters landing and taking off according to a ceremonial timetable.
On the flight-deck of an American super-carrier, there is almost no time when two humans can be heard in a dialogue even when they are shouting at each other because there is a plane landing or taking off every 30 seconds.
Comparisons may be unfair because nations use their weapons of war differently and certainly none uses them the way the US does. Even so, for the purposes of technicalities, they convey something.
The INS Vikramaditya, which displaces 44,500 tonnes, is less than half the size of a warship like the Nimitz, which is nuclear-powered. Yet, there is a crucial bit of technology they share: the arrested wire landing system for aircraft.
On the Vikramaditya and INS Viraat, fixed-wing aircraft take off from a ski-jump — unless they are Sea Harrier aircraft capable of vertical take-offs and landings — but the landings are “traps”.
Essentially, fixed-wing aircraft coming in to land must have tail hooks that grab arrester wire cables that shock the planes into a stop — often from speeds as high as 250kmph to zero in two seconds and within a distance of 90 metres.
On the Nimitz, the experience of a catapult-assisted take-off is akin to feeling like a human arrow shot from a bow. An arrested landing is like —multiplied several times in magnitude — a thoroughbred on a racetrack being forced to stop because its tail has been caught by an irresistible force.
It is one of the most complex skills in naval aviation — the carrier is also moving. Because India’s carrier qualification of pilots has got delayed and also because of the absence of other infrastructure, India has built a shore-based test facility to train the pilots at INS Hansa, the naval air station in Dabolim, Goa.
During yesterday’s demonstrations around the Vikramaditya, Modi could witness only one stage of the training — that of touch-and-go flying — that a fighter pilot based on a carrier is expected to be adept at before mastering the skill of arrested landing.
The only aircraft that took off and landed on the VKD yesterday were helicopters, which operate from other Indian warships in any case. Part of the reason was the weather: Modi had decided to visit the VKD as the monsoon was setting in and Cyclone Nanauk was still being felt here.
The other reason was that there are not enough carrier-qualified pilots for the MiG29K aircraft, which are the main combat arm of the VKD. Captain (Commodore) Suraj Berry, the commissioning commanding officer of the Vikramaditya, who sailed the ship from Russia to India last winter, said there were 12 such pilots.
The Indian Navy plans to have 27 MiG29Ks, of which 16 have arrived from Russia. Its pilots are certified as carrier-qualified by Russian test pilots who visit here as part of the contract for the purchase of the VKD and the MiG29ks.
China is the only other Asian power to have an aircraft carrier, also originally the Russian Varyag that it has modified into the Liaoning. But China’s experience in carrier operations is not even a year old. India has been operating carriers for 50 years.
“We follow a sea-control concept,” an admiral explained the Indian Navy doctrine. “And an aircraft carrier is essentially like a boxer with 10 long hands that can fight long distances in every direction.”
The Vikramaditya can embark a total of 34 aircraft. Apart from the MiG 29K, it can take on board helicopters and, if and when it is available, the indigenous light combat aircraft (naval version) Tejas.
That is an unforeseeable future away.
The Vikramaditya will ultimately have 110 officers and about 1,500 sailors. It is as high as a 20-storey building, and has 23 decks and eight boilers in which the staff are on watch in four-hour shifts because of the high temperatures.
It is yet to be integrated with a close-in weapons system. But its “ops room” on the third deck is armed with a LESORUB communications centre that gives the crew real-time pictures of what is happening within and outside the ship. It has a 30-bed hospital with six doctors and 30 paramedical staff.
Its galleys — kitchens —are equipped with roti and dosa makers and its chefs produce a killer gulab jamun, layered by desiccated coconut crumbs.

Comment: Till there is another Indo-Pak war let those Navy boys enjoy good food!
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