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Engine #2 of tri-holers

 
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Aseem
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PostPosted: Sun May 13, 2012 8:25 am    Post subject: Engine #2 of tri-holers Reply with quote

Wondering how is the engine number #2 of a tri-holer mounted/supported on a flimsy tail? It always surprises me.
thnx
VT-ASJ
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HAWK21M
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PostPosted: Tue May 15, 2012 4:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If i tell you that a powerplant on most types are held by just Three nuts....would you believe me Smile
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sumantra
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PostPosted: Tue May 15, 2012 5:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

HAWK21M wrote:
If i tell you that a powerplant on most types are held by just Three nuts....would you believe me Smile

...and who exactly are these nuts? Wink
Cheers, Sumantra.
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The_Goat
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PostPosted: Tue May 15, 2012 8:33 pm    Post subject: Re: Engine #2 of tri-holers Reply with quote

Aseem wrote:
Wondering how is the engine number #2 of a tri-holer mounted/supported on a flimsy tail? It always surprises me.
thnx
VT-ASJ


In the L1011 and 727, the engine 2 is mounted on top of the fuselage, not on the tail. In fact, the tail is mounted on the engine 2, not the other way around.

It is only in the DC-10/MD-11 that the entire engine 2 is mounted on the tail, but the part attaching the engine to the fuselage is reinforced to support the weight of the engine. It is much thicker than the rest of the tail.

Quote:
i tell you that a powerplant on most types are held by just Three nuts....would you believe me


Are these titanium nuts? I remember seeing a documentary on the VC-10 where they showed these nuts on the Conway engines, and they were massive. Almost 6 inches thick.
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sammyk
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PostPosted: Tue May 15, 2012 11:13 pm    Post subject: Re: Engine #2 of tri-holers Reply with quote

The_Goat wrote:
Aseem wrote:
Wondering how is the engine number #2 of a tri-holer mounted/supported on a flimsy tail? It always surprises me.
thnx
VT-ASJ


In the L1011 and 727, the engine 2 is mounted on top of the fuselage, not on the tail. In fact, the tail is mounted on the engine 2, not the other way around.

It is only in the DC-10/MD-11 that the engine 2 is mounted on the tail, but the part attaching the engine to the fuselage is reinforced to support the weight of the engine. It is much thicker than the rest of the tail.

Quote:
i tell you that a powerplant on most types are held by just Three nuts....would you believe me


Are these titanium nuts? I remember seeing a documentary on the VC-10 where they showed these nuts on the Conway engines, and they were massive. Almost 6 inches thick.


Not really and someone can correct me if I'm wrong. The engine on the L-1011 and 727 is not ON the fuselage but in the tail. There is an S-duct that from the inlet (that you see on top of the fuselage) to the engine.

On the DC-10, depends on how you look at it. One can assume that the tail is somehow holding the engine in place. However, if you look at it, it's more of a pylon/banjo fairing that is used to attach the engine to the fuselage with the tail attached to the top of the engine.

I think I read somewhere there is only on bolt used for a C-5 Galaxy engine.
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The_Goat
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PostPosted: Wed May 16, 2012 12:11 am    Post subject: Re: Engine #2 of tri-holers Reply with quote

sammyk wrote:


Not really and someone can correct me if I'm wrong. The engine on the L-1011 and 727 is not ON the fuselage but in the tail. There is an S-duct that from the inlet (that you see on top of the fuselage) to the engine.


True, I stand corrected that the engines are not 'on' the fuselage. What I wanted to say was that the engine 2 isn't attached to the ' tail' either, as per Aseem's original question. The engine 2 is located in the fuselage.

sammyk wrote:

On the DC-10, depends on how you look at it. One can assume that the tail is somehow holding the engine in place. However, if you look at it, it's more of a pylon/banjo fairing that is used to attach the engine to the fuselage with the tail attached to the top of the engine.


Hmm....

A close look reveals that the cowling is a bit compressed below the place where the tail attachment begins. It comes back to normal beneath the stabilisers. Wonder why this 'crimp' exists? Is the tail actually linked directly to the pylon/banjo fairing, and not merely to the engine?

http://www.airliners.net/photo/United-Parcel-Service/McDonnell-Douglas-MD-11%28F%29/2104533/L/&sid=1534f2ccfc3017a624f875e3fbb3cce8
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sammyk
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PostPosted: Wed May 16, 2012 1:42 am    Post subject: Re: Engine #2 of tri-holers Reply with quote

The_Goat wrote:
sammyk wrote:


Not really and someone can correct me if I'm wrong. The engine on the L-1011 and 727 is not ON the fuselage but in the tail. There is an S-duct that from the inlet (that you see on top of the fuselage) to the engine.


True, I stand corrected that the engines are not 'on' the fuselage. What I wanted to say was that the engine 2 isn't attached to the ' tail' either, as per Aseem's original question. The engine 2 is located in the fuselage.

sammyk wrote:

On the DC-10, depends on how you look at it. One can assume that the tail is somehow holding the engine in place. However, if you look at it, it's more of a pylon/banjo fairing that is used to attach the engine to the fuselage with the tail attached to the top of the engine.


Hmm....

A close look reveals that the cowling is a bit compressed below the place where the tail attachment begins. It comes back to normal beneath the stabilisers. Wonder why this 'crimp' exists? Is the tail actually linked directly to the pylon/banjo fairing, and not merely to the engine?

http://www.airliners.net/photo/United-Parcel-Service/McDonnell-Douglas-MD-11%28F%29/2104533/L/&sid=1534f2ccfc3017a624f875e3fbb3cce8


Not sure what you mean by compressed cowling* but yes, the banjo fairing also supports the tail.

*You have pictured an MD-11 that has a bulbous intake as opposed to a DC-10 where it is straight (except for the PW powered ones). Is this the "compression" you are referring to?
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The_Goat
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PostPosted: Wed May 16, 2012 1:49 am    Post subject: Re: Engine #2 of tri-holers Reply with quote

sammyk wrote:





Not sure what you mean by compressed cowling* but yes, the banjo fairing also supports the tail.

*You have pictured an MD-11 that has a bulbous intake as opposed to a DC-10 where it is straight (except for the PW powered ones). Is this the "compression" you are referring to?


Yes, that is the 'compression' I'm referring to. Wrong word, I know.

Also I never knew it wasn't like that on non PW DC-10s. Thanks for pointing out.
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sammyk
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PostPosted: Wed May 16, 2012 2:46 am    Post subject: Re: Engine #2 of tri-holers Reply with quote

The_Goat wrote:
sammyk wrote:





Not sure what you mean by compressed cowling* but yes, the banjo fairing also supports the tail.

*You have pictured an MD-11 that has a bulbous intake as opposed to a DC-10 where it is straight (except for the PW powered ones). Is this the "compression" you are referring to?


Yes, that is the 'compression' I'm referring to. Wrong word, I know.

Also I never knew it wasn't like that on non PW DC-10s. Thanks for pointing out.


The PW DC-10s are actually quite rare (maybe less than 50 made) as only Northwest and JAL used them and later Aeroflot converted one or some to freighters. The vast majority of DC-10s have a "straight pipe"

DC-10 - http://www.airliners.net/photo/Air-Afrique/McDonnell-Douglas-DC-10-30/2097886/L/

DC-10 w/ PW engines - http://www.airliners.net/photo/Northwest-Airlines/McDonnell-Douglas-DC-10-40/2053201/L/

MD-11 - http://www.airliners.net/photo/Lufthansa-Cargo/McDonnell-Douglas-MD-11F/2098156/L/
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HAWK21M
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 26, 2012 4:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

sumantra wrote:
HAWK21M wrote:
If i tell you that a powerplant on most types are held by just Three nuts....would you believe me Smile

...and who exactly are these nuts? Wink
Cheers, Sumantra.


They just have a number and look the same.....no one I know personally though Wink
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Aseem
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PostPosted: Fri Dec 28, 2012 9:25 am    Post subject: Re: Engine #2 of tri-holers Reply with quote

sammyk wrote:

The PW DC-10s are actually quite rare (maybe less than 50 made) as only Northwest and JAL used them and later Aeroflot converted one or some to freighters. The vast majority of DC-10s have a "straight pipe"

DC-10 - http://www.airliners.net/photo/Air-Afrique/McDonnell-Douglas-DC-10-30/2097886/L/

DC-10 w/ PW engines - http://www.airliners.net/photo/Northwest-Airlines/McDonnell-Douglas-DC-10-40/2053201/L/

MD-11 - http://www.airliners.net/photo/Lufthansa-Cargo/McDonnell-Douglas-MD-11F/2098156/L/


That's priceless info...

VT-ASJ
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