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FAA downgrades India's aviation safety ranking
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Jeh
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 31, 2014 4:22 pm    Post subject: FAA downgrades India's aviation safety ranking Reply with quote

It has happened.

http://profit.ndtv.com/news/economy/article-us-regulator-downgrades-indias-aviation-safety-ranking-379186?pfrom=home-otherstories

India's aviation safety ratings have been downgraded by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) from the top to the second category, which would affect expansion of flights by Indian carriers to the United States.

The FAA downgrade of India's safety rankings would effectively bar Air India and Jet Airways from increasing flights to the US from what they currently operate or have any new code-share relationships with any US airline.

However, it does not mean that these airlines are unsafe but show that the Directorate General of Civil Aviation's safety oversight may not be enough to properly monitor safety performance of Indian carriers.

"It is a big national embarrassment, particularly for the fact that for five years we did not get our act together. There was a first warning of a downgrade in 2009 which we managed to avert by bringing in some temporary people," Kapil Kaul of aviation consultancy firm Centre for Asia Pacific Aviation, told NDTV.

To avoid such a downgrade, the Indian aviation regulator had been rushing to take several steps in the recent past to recruit more professional and technical hands and preparing technical manuals to provide for fresh rules to meet the exigencies of the growing Indian aviation market.

Shares of Jet Airways fell 4 per cent to Rs. 236.45 on BSE.
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jasepl
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 31, 2014 4:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Cue the typical reactions:

- who are you to blame us?
- look at your own vote counting system before pointing fingers at our air safety mechanism.
- how dare you treat us this way?
- we will retaliate
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Jeh
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 31, 2014 4:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

jasepl wrote:
Cue the typical reactions:

- who are you to blame us?
- look at your own vote counting system before pointing fingers at our air safety mechanism.
- how dare you treat us this way?
- we will retaliate


Or better still, the lightsabre of Indian bureaucratic retaliation - we'll withdraw the liquor permits of the American Embassy.

This is one of the many days on which I'm ashamed of my country, but I hope that the sheer embarrassment of this will see heads roll, and that something will be done to put things right quickly.

Can we put this down as another star on the UPA report-card? Indian aviation was supposed to be the next big thing when they took over.
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jasepl
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 31, 2014 4:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jeh wrote:
I hope that the sheer embarrassment of this will see heads roll, and that something will be done to put things right quickly.

Can we put this down as another star on the UPA report-card? Indian aviation was supposed to be the next big thing when they took over.


Don't hold your breath. When the Olympic committee demanded change, the reaction was as above. And then when it suspended India's membership, the official reaction was "Oh well, our athletes don't have a medal chance anyway."

As for the UPA, it's certainly one of the things that should go on their report card. What's sadder is that we would likely be in similar situations regardless of the government in power.
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The_Goat
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 31, 2014 5:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

jasepl wrote:
Cue the typical reactions:

- who are you to blame us?
- look at your own vote counting system before pointing fingers at our air safety mechanism.
- how dare you treat us this way?
- we will retaliate


You forgot the ultimate one

-Don't underestimate our clout (sic!)

I can't wait for the Mera Bharat Mahaan Brigade on this forum to come out with guns blazing. Bring it on people! in Amreekiyon ne Bharat Mata ki izzat loot li hai, Eent ka jawab pathar se dena hoga Wink


jeh wrote:
Can we put this down as another star on the UPA report-card? Indian aviation was supposed to be the next big thing when they took over.


It was.

Then one day, PP and his cronies took over.

The rest is history.
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abhijith16
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 31, 2014 5:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

That's right. Regardless of which ever government in the centre, no one will give a rat's ass about a good, sound aviation policy.

Aviation in India is f****d, thanks to these morons. I'm truly ashamed of my country Sad
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jasepl
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 31, 2014 5:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The_Goat wrote:
I can't wait for the Mera Bharat Mahaan Brigade on this forum to come out with guns blazing.

Oh dear lord. That brings back flashbacks of the mind-numbing toilet thread.

The_Goat wrote:
Then one day, PP and his cronies took over.

The rest is history.

Honestly, I don't think this is one of the things we can blame on Prafull. But I don't know enough of the details.
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me111993
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 31, 2014 6:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

As disgusting and crap this has been, what next, what is the review process? How does one get back?


Hopefully, hopefully, these morons will wake up now.
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justbala
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PostPosted: Sat Feb 01, 2014 12:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Can somebody in the know (like 747-237 or TKMCE or Ojas ) please what the impact of this is? Both to airlines passengers n Indian Airports.

Not looking for Madame BBB'S melodramatic defence of her White Massa.
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jasepl
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PostPosted: Sat Feb 01, 2014 12:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

me111993 wrote:
As disgusting and crap this has been, what next, what is the review process? How does one get back?

I don't know exactly how the FAA or ICAO work, but, in general, changes are assessed and eventually rated over a period of time. However, I suspect in many ways it will be similar to how many other international organisations work.

If so, then it's not just one missed report or a handful of random deficiencies that resulted in the downgrade. Rather, it's a series of regular occurrences, over an extended period of time (apparently over a year since they were pointed out until the time the downgrade was formalised).

To put it in rather simplistic terms, to regain the higher rating, the identified deficiencies must be rectified and shown to have been rectified over a period of time.

Basically, the gaps pointed out must be remedied and things must be done in accordance with the regulation for a set period of time before another audit. If that audit is clean, then the higher rating is reinstated.

The proving time's unclear, but I doubt if the overall process will be very different.
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The_Goat
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PostPosted: Sat Feb 01, 2014 1:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

justbala wrote:
Can somebody in the know (like 747-237 or TKMCE or Ojas ) please what the impact of this is? Both to airlines passengers n Indian Airports.

Not looking for Madame BBB'S melodramatic defence of her White Massa.


This article sheds some light

http://www.moneycontrol.com/news/economy/how-faa-air-safety-downgrade-impacts-indian-carriers_1035352.html

Basically

1. No further expansion by Indian carriers into the US allowed, until further notice.
2. Code share agreements affected
3. Existing flights may be subjected to stringent checks, which may impact adherence to schedule.
4. Leasing and borrowing costs may go up for Indian carriers, putting further stress on their balance sheets.

And apparently, one big reason for this has been the US concerns over shortage of staff at the DGCA Rolling Eyes
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iah87
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PostPosted: Sat Feb 01, 2014 3:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

How will this affect AI's Star entry. Especially for the code share approvals, can AI put its code share on UA flights from EWR and ORD and for LH flights to USA from FRA; and UA code share from ORD to DEL/HYD, assuming UA is interested.


I dont see much of an impact on Jet as they are not planning to expand anyway to USA and they have bazillion code shares.
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sri_bom
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PostPosted: Sat Feb 01, 2014 8:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The_Goat wrote:
justbala wrote:
Can somebody in the know (like 747-237 or TKMCE or Ojas ) please what the impact of this is? Both to airlines passengers n Indian Airports.

Not looking for Madame BBB'S melodramatic defence of her White Massa.


This article sheds some light

http://www.moneycontrol.com/news/economy/how-faa-air-safety-downgrade-impacts-indian-carriers_1035352.html

Basically

1. No further expansion by Indian carriers into the US allowed, until further notice.
2. Code share agreements affected
3. Existing flights may be subjected to stringent checks, which may impact adherence to schedule.
4. Leasing and borrowing costs may go up for Indian carriers, putting further stress on their balance sheets.

And apparently, one big reason for this has been the US concerns over shortage of staff at the DGCA Rolling Eyes


Some corporates clients will stop using Indian carriers that is if they can avoid. In ASEAN region I know a few companies whose travel policy prohibits them on flying Philippines Air or Cebu Air as Philipines is in the same boat like India.

Sri_Bom
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jasepl
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PostPosted: Sat Feb 01, 2014 12:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If not resolved quickly, in the near term, I see this impacting Jet more than AI. And that's only because AI's plans don't hinge on feed from third parties. Their focus remains on connecting a host of Indian cities with a bunch of places across the world, all on their own metal.

Fibga, on the other hand, seem to want to depend on others for everything:
- at home in Dhabi
- abroad everywhere (LHR/BRU/MXP/CDG/JNB/EWR/JFK/SFO/YYZ/HKG/BKK/SIN)
- in no-man's land (BOM/DEL).

As for alliance membership, I don't know why it would be a hindrance. Members aren't obligated to codeshare with all other members.
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PostPosted: Sat Feb 01, 2014 10:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Indian Government must realize that USA is not like India. In US all types of corruption, criminal activities, crimes committed by politicians or high and mighty are punished..

So even in Devayani Khobraghade's case also India can't help her get away from being prosecuted under the US law.
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jasepl
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PostPosted: Sat Feb 01, 2014 10:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm sorry, but you're making it sound like America's the same as some sort of fictional utopia. There are corrupt and incompetent people everywhere, and the system is gamed and abused everywhere. We don't own the rights to that.

Rich and powerful people get treated differently everywhere. And it doesn't seem any actual crime has been committed by the useless DGCA wallahs, so I just don't see the context of that logic.

I do agree that it is an unfortunate sign of the times. There was a time when the railway minister would resign because of a little derailment in Bihar - something that in no way was the minister's fault or doing. Now we have Rajas and Kalmadis refusing to budge even when caught red-handed and a Modi who refuses to take responsibility, never mind resign, for the horrors went down on his watch, and aiming to be PM instead..

The simple thing is that the Americans have a set of requirements (good or bad, sensible or not is irrelevant). The said meet these requirements or we will start applying restrictions - solely when it comes to flight operations that are connected to their country.

Similarly, we've always been free to require whatever of airlines and authorities from other countries too. I don't recall us ever having done it, except as an immature, tit-for-tat reaction.

It's basic desi mentality that permeates everything : the last bit is never done right, if at all. And because our countries got all pretend BFF-y in the recent past, we began to think they will overlook a bunch of things (I'm your friend let it go) and they began to think we will get more responsible when it comes to certain matters.

Both sides are delusional.
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PostPosted: Sat Feb 01, 2014 10:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm sorry but this is ridiculous. Shows the total failure of the current government. Corruption runs so deep that they cannot even pivot and correct things when they are about to get banned. And why does India need the FAA to have to uncover safety issues - sad day that India can't even regulate themselves. This and the Olympics ban show how far india has fallen.

As they say - throw the bums out
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jasepl
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PostPosted: Sat Feb 01, 2014 10:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Caliguy wrote:
As they say - throw the bums out

They will only be replaced by other, just as bummy bums. That's the unfortunate reality.

And the problem isn't just at the top level. On the ground, unfortunately, the majority of people tasked with doing something don't always have a true grasp of what exactly they're doing, why they're doing it, or even what the guy standing 2 metres away is doing. And a majority of the juniormost on the ground folks why provide a service aren't users of said type of service, so they just can't relate. It's a function of income and education disparity.

Not a justification by any means, just an opinion.
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PostPosted: Sun Feb 02, 2014 11:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I guess they're going in for a tombstone approach to change.

Waiting for a second Charkhi Dadri, I guess.
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 03, 2014 10:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The writing was on the wall for so long, it's not funny. Serves us right for botching up something as basic as aviation safety. I hope this serves as the wake up call and we do something to empower the aviation security team.
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jasepl
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 03, 2014 1:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nimish wrote:
we do something to empower the aviation security team.

Nimish - their having power isn't the problem; they seem to have enough. Thing is they're more interested in things that are none of their business, such as fares and meals and all that jazz.
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 03, 2014 2:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

India’s aviation safety record above global average: Ministry of Civil Aviation
News
3-Feb-2014 10:15 AM
India's Civil Aviation Ministry stated (31-Jan-2014) ICAO's assessment of India on Universal Safety Oversight Audit Programme (USOAP) is "much above the global average". The Ministry noted that under USOAP, ICAO has identified eight critical elements on legislation, organisation, licensing, operation, airworthiness, accident investigation, air navigation and aerodromes. As per ICAO 2013 Safety Report based on USOAP audit results as on 31-Dec-2012, India figures among the states having effective implementation above the global average, which is 61%. India’s effective implementation stands at 79.1%. The Ministry added: "The only area in which India lacks marginally in effective implementation of critical element is `organisation’. For this, India has already created 75 posts of Chief Flight Operations Inspector (CFOI), Deputy CFOIs, Senior CFOIs and FOIs. After the recruitment, it is expected that effective implementation in this element also would rise much above the global average. In fact, in legislation even USA (80.95) is below India (85.71)".
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HAWK21M
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 03, 2014 4:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Heard only 2 of the 33 points pending to be tackled.......
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 03, 2014 5:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

HAWK21M wrote:
Heard only 2 of the 33 points pending to be tackled.......


Yes, but once addressed, how much longer will it take to get back the Cat-1 status?
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 03, 2014 8:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

HAWK21M wrote:
Heard only 2 of the 33 points pending to be tackled.......


Got me thinking.... in the early days of colonialism, the European powers went about setting naval protocols, tolls and taxes for travel and trade via the high seas. In the modern era, ships have been replaced by planes and Europe by the US, but the spirit still remains.

Personally I believe that rules set in a low-context environment are not the best fit for a high context environment. The basic assumptions end up being null and void.

We have seen this happen time and again in Korean and Japanese context. High time we stop aping the west and adopting things blindly.

Of course the ilk of Madame BBB can never tolerate a syllable against her "White Massa".. so brace for a "How dare you" whinefest from Bundbay Wink
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Jeh
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 03, 2014 8:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

justbala wrote:
Got me thinking.... in the early days of colonialism, the European powers went about setting naval protocols, tolls and taxes for travel and trade via the high seas. In the modern era, ships have been replaced by planes and Europe by the US, but the spirit still remains.

Personally I believe that rules set in a low-context environment are not the best fit for a high context environment. The basic assumptions end up being null and void.

We have seen this happen time and again in Korean and Japanese context. High time we stop aping the west and adopting things blindly.

Of course the ilk of Madame BBB can never tolerate a syllable against her "White Massa".. so brace for a "How dare you" whinefest from Bundbay Wink


Well, I, for one, am glad the Europeans and the Americans control aviation regulation and not us - their rigour and commitment to processes and institutions is the reason why air travel is the safest mode of transport there is. I suppose the Indian Railways is a useful example of the fatality rate you'd have in aviation if we set the safety standards.

It's not about "blindly aping" the West - the world has to have a single, standardised system of aviation regulation, so why not go with the most stringent and rigorous system there is (which happens to be the 'Western' one)?

Or perhaps I have completely misunderstood your post? What did you mean by "low-context" and "high-context" again?
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 03, 2014 8:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jeh wrote:
justbala wrote:
Got me thinking.... in the early days of colonialism, the European powers went about setting naval protocols, tolls and taxes for travel and trade via the high seas. In the modern era, ships have been replaced by planes and Europe by the US, but the spirit still remains.

Personally I believe that rules set in a low-context environment are not the best fit for a high context environment. The basic assumptions end up being null and void.

We have seen this happen time and again in Korean and Japanese context. High time we stop aping the west and adopting things blindly.

Of course the ilk of Madame BBB can never tolerate a syllable against her "White Massa".. so brace for a "How dare you" whinefest from Bundbay Wink


Well, I, for one, am glad the Europeans and the Americans control aviation regulation and not us - their rigour and commitment to processes and institutions is the reason why air travel is the safest mode of transport there is. I suppose the Indian Railways is a useful example of the fatality rate you'd have in aviation if we set the safety standards.

It's not about "blindly aping" the West - the world has to have a single, standardised system of aviation regulation, so why not go with the most stringent and rigorous system there is (which happens to be the 'Western' one)?

Or perhaps I have completely misunderstood your post? What did you mean by "low-context" and "high-context" again?


This shud probably explain it -

http://designtaxi.com/news/361007/Minimalistic-Visualizations-Explain-Differences-In-Eastern-And-Western-Cultures/

Like for e.g. in the West, the co-pilot and senior pilots are kinda equal, while in the eastern cultures - hierarchy rules. Cause enough for multiple incidents and accidents in Korea/Japan and even India. A rule that works in the west, just does not gel into the Asian context.
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jasepl
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 03, 2014 8:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

me111993 wrote:
HAWK21M wrote:
Heard only 2 of the 33 points pending to be tackled.......


Yes, but once addressed, how much longer will it take to get back the Cat-1 status?

Again, I don't know about the FAA specifically, but going by experience with similar organisations, I would say one full quarter after a successful re-audit.

It's funny how both the Indian and American officials are obsessed with paperwork, just in very different directions.
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 04, 2014 8:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

justbala wrote:


Got me thinking.... in the early days of colonialism, the European powers went about setting naval protocols, tolls and taxes for travel and trade via the high seas. In the modern era, ships have been replaced by planes and Europe by the US, but the spirit still remains.

Personally I believe that rules set in a low-context environment are not the best fit for a high context environment. The basic assumptions end up being null and void.

We have seen this happen time and again in Korean and Japanese context. High time we stop aping the west and adopting things blindly.

Of course the ilk of Madame BBB can never tolerate a syllable against her "White Massa".. so brace for a "How dare you" whinefest from Bundbay Wink


The issue here is that the number of DGCA safety inspectors is far below what is needed to maintain certain standards, increasing the chances of lapses by Indian Airline operators going unnoticed. It has nothing to do with the level of context or with cultural differences in work practices.

Many countries around the world do not have their safety standards downgraded by the FAA in spite of having vastly different cultural and working environments compared to the US. The Japanese and Koreans are prime examples. How do you explain this?

Safety rules are not considered priority in India, and it is not just in aviation. The culture is simply not there, let us accept that. It would be preposterous if we demanded a first rate safety certification in spite of our 'chalta hai' attitude towards everything, including safety.
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 04, 2014 8:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

India’s air safety record better than US: India Civil Aviation Ministry
News
4-Feb-2014 10:28 AM

India's Civil Aviation Ministry said the number of aviation accidents in India were far fewer than those in the US from 2009 to 2012 (Hindustan Times, 03-Feb-2014). The Ministry outlined the following aviation accident rates:
•2009: There was one accident involving a scheduled commercial aircraft in India, while there were 26 accidents in the US. The accident rate per million flight departures for 2009 in India was 1.7%, while it was 2.7% in the US;

•2001: One accident involving a scheduled commercial aircraft was reported in India, while there were as many as 27 accidents in the US. The accident rate per million flight departures for 2010 in India was 1.6%, while it was 2.8% in the US;

•2011: There were no accidents involving scheduled commercial aircraft in India, while there were 28 in the US. The accident rate per million flight departures for 2011 in India was zero, while it was 3.1% in the US;

•2012: No accidents involving scheduled commercial aircraft in India, while there were 24 in the US. The accident rate per million flight departures for 2012 in India was again zero.
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jasepl
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 04, 2014 8:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oh dear God! Trust the babu-mantri brigade to spend more time and energy conjuring up pointless defences of their shortcomings, rather than do what is required of them.
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 04, 2014 8:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

jasepl wrote:
Oh dear God! Trust the babu-mantri brigade to spend more time and energy conjuring up pointless defences of their shortcomings, rather than do what is required of them.


Very Happy The comparision is absolutely Ridicoulus. There are more planes flying in the USA than in India.
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 04, 2014 8:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well, it may just be true that proportionally our safety record is better (likely because many incidents went unreported, which was one of the points of the downgrade).

It really doesn't matter, because it's their regulations and they can more or less demand what they want. Just like we can demand what we want, except we don't. Because then we'd have to comply with our own requirements! So thank God for small mercies - else we'd look even more ridiculous than we already do.
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sshank
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 05, 2014 3:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

justbala wrote:
Jeh wrote:
justbala wrote:
Got me thinking.... in the early days of colonialism, the European powers went about setting naval protocols, tolls and taxes for travel and trade via the high seas. In the modern era, ships have been replaced by planes and Europe by the US, but the spirit still remains.

Personally I believe that rules set in a low-context environment are not the best fit for a high context environment. The basic assumptions end up being null and void.

We have seen this happen time and again in Korean and Japanese context. High time we stop aping the west and adopting things blindly.

Of course the ilk of Madame BBB can never tolerate a syllable against her "White Massa".. so brace for a "How dare you" whinefest from Bundbay Wink


Well, I, for one, am glad the Europeans and the Americans control aviation regulation and not us - their rigour and commitment to processes and institutions is the reason why air travel is the safest mode of transport there is. I suppose the Indian Railways is a useful example of the fatality rate you'd have in aviation if we set the safety standards.

It's not about "blindly aping" the West - the world has to have a single, standardised system of aviation regulation, so why not go with the most stringent and rigorous system there is (which happens to be the 'Western' one)?

Or perhaps I have completely misunderstood your post? What did you mean by "low-context" and "high-context" again?


This shud probably explain it -

http://designtaxi.com/news/361007/Minimalistic-Visualizations-Explain-Differences-In-Eastern-And-Western-Cultures/

Like for e.g. in the West, the co-pilot and senior pilots are kinda equal, while in the eastern cultures - hierarchy rules. Cause enough for multiple incidents and accidents in Korea/Japan and even India. A rule that works in the west, just does not gel into the Asian context.



And you know how KE fixed it right? Yes, getting DL and UA pilots to take over the training and making all KE pilots communicate in English.
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 05, 2014 4:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

something in greater detail

http://www.mindtools.com/pages/article/seven-dimensions.htm?sthash.zKNbvNOi.mjjo#!

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PostPosted: Thu Feb 06, 2014 11:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

jasepl wrote:
It really doesn't matter, because it's their regulations and they can more or less demand what they want. Just like we can demand what we want, except we don't. Because then we'd have to comply with our own requirements! So thank God for small mercies - else we'd look even more ridiculous than we already do.


I know it's a bit tongue-in-cheek, but this sums the entire saga up.
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 06, 2014 8:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I would say we need to adopt the best that is in the interest of safety of the flying public. To that extent, the cultural attitude in India is a BIG issue. The crew CRM used to be an issue in the West too, until the KLM/Panam Tenerife disaster in 1977.

But I will disregard the so-called West-defined safety norms when India designs, builds and operates commercial airplanes as good as or better thano the Boeings/Buses etc of the world. And going by where we are, thats going to take quite a few generations.
The scientific rigour , discipline and attitude of sticking to standards is simply not there. Perhaps it used to be during Indias golden age (pre-colonialism) but thats a different story.

Until then, the DGCA and Indian carriers better straighten their @sses up.
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 07, 2014 7:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

A good read from CAPA on this topic: http://centreforaviation.com/analysis/faa-downgrade-shows-systemic-flaws-in-indias-aviation-safety-oversight-jet-airways-most-affected-150822
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ssbmat
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 10, 2014 8:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

[quote="Jeh"]
justbala wrote:

I suppose the Indian Railways is a useful example of the fatality rate you'd have in aviation if we set the safety standards.


Let us not compare apples with oranges. Indian Railways has to operate in some of the WORST environments possible (even today) and of course over the past many decades. There are some places where only the intrepid attitude of the Railway staff has seen them carry out operations without a hitch.
The Railway infrastructure is excellent in the developed parts of the country, and appalling in others. Not to mention the political climate that so directly affects the operations from time to time.

But Indian aviation has suffered none of these issues, especially in the last 10-15 years. Inspite of that , if there are safety lacunae then DGCA/MOCA is directly responsible.
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 10, 2014 12:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

How do you get Qualified Technical persons to join DGCA if the scale offered is 10-20% of the market.
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